Spoons for sale, Nov 2016

I read somewhere that I haven’t been doing much woodworking lately! And I kept thinking about this all season, as I worked on building a shop by hand. Certainly, 2016 has been a slow year for me, furniture-wise and woodenware-wise. And the spoons are really something that fell by the wayside. Turns out carpentry makes me more tired than joinery. So I only have a few spoons for sale right now. I did update a page of a few furniture items I have available for sale – including 2 boxes and a stool at reduced prices. A couple of these are stuff that there’s no room for in the new workshop; two things are from around the house. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/furniture-for-sale-fall-2016/

I’m slowly getting back to making custom furniture, in my typical carved oak style. Feel free to contact me if you’re looking for something like that. I also hope to add one-on-one student sessions here. More on that to come.

Here’s the spoons for sale – paypal works the easiest, I can send you an invoice. Just leave a comment if there’s a spoon you want. Prices include shipping in US, outside the states, I’ll add something for shipping. If you would rather, you can send a check. Just let me know…

I forgot to mention, Maureen has some new stuff on her etsy site too – https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

thanks,
Peter Follansbee

 

Spoons for Sale

Spoon 01 –  SOLD

serving spoon, made from an English wood, maybe Rowan.

L: 9 1/2″

$75.

spoon-nov-01

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Spoon 09 – apple – SOLD

another in a long series of odd-ball spoon-ish sculptures. This was made during a demonstration, and I didn’t have enough wood with me. This branch was quite weird, and I had to really work at it to get a spoon out of it!

L: 12″

$70

spoon-nov-09

THE SPOONS BELOW HERE ARE SOLD AS OF WEDNESDAY NOV 30. I HOPE TO FINISH SOME MORE IN THE NEXT WEEK AND POST THEM RIGHT AWAY. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT. 

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Spoon 02 – birch serving spoon. SOLD

L: 11″

$80

spoon-nov-02

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Spoon 03 – SOLD

This small server might be rowan also. I started several spoons while I was in England, finished them here. Lost track of which wood was which.

L: 9 3/4″

$70

spoon-nov-03

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spoon-nov-04

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Spoon 05 – SOLD

this extra long cooking spoon is from an apple tree right here in my yard.

L: 15″

$90

spoon-nov-05

spoon-nov-05-detail

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Spoon 06 – willow – SOLD

my favorite spoon of the batch. Fred Livesay split a crook of willow right when we got to Spoonfest in England, and it was too thick for what he wanted. So he split it again, and handed me this small section to carve. Thanks, Fred.

L: 8″

$75

spoon-nov-06-side

spoon-nov-06-overall

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Spoon 07 – SOLD

rowan or cherry

Another hard wood serving spoon.

L: 9 3/4″

$75

spoon-nov-07

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Spoon 08 – apple – SOLD

A nice little crook for a spoon.

L: 8″

$70

spoon-nov-08

spoon-nov-08-overall

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more inspiration from the Season of Fests

more-inspiration

Recently I wrote about inspiration in the form of a slew of new books. There was more inspiration stemming from the Season of the Fest – Greenwood Fest, Spoonfest, Täljfest and beyond. Here’s a few items I gathered; some gifts, most purchased, from some of the people I worked alongside.

Many of the spoons came from Spoonfest. First (for no reason other than I photographed it first) is a large serving spoon by Jan Harm ter Brugge. http://www.houtvanbomen.com/HoutvanBomen/houtvanbomen-_English_summary.html

jan-harm-ter-brugge
Jan harm ter Brugge

A nice beech plate from Owen Thomas, nice person, nice plate. https://www.instagram.com/owenthomaswoodcraft/

owen-thomas
Owen Thomas

Eating spoons – one from Simon Hill. Part of the “internet came alive” phenomenon for me, was seeing Simon’s work. https://simonhillgreenwoodwork.wordpress.com/gallery/

simon-hill
Simon Hill
simon-hill-profile
Simon Hill

Another eater. Magnus Sundelin made it. Forgot he sold it to me, & panicked, thinking it was lost when he went to show it to his students! https://www.instagram.com/sloydmagnus/

magnus-sundelin
Magnus Sundelin
magnus-profile
Magnus Sundelin

Another British wonder – Adam Hawker. https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100005448825480  great stuff.

adam-hawker
Adam Hawker

2 by Beth Moen, https://www.instagram.com/bethsusana/ bookended my Season of Fests w Beth at Greenwood Fest in June & Täljfest in August.

beth-profile
Beth Moen
beth-moen
Beth Moen

A wooden spoon finished with urushi lacquer by Madoka, Masashi Kutsuwa’s wife. Wow. Here’s Masashi’s page, I can’t find anything by Madoka… https://www.instagram.com/masashi_kutsuwa/ and https://www.facebook.com/masashi.kutsuwa

madoka-spoon
Madoka
maduka-detail
Madoka

Dave Fisher’s duck bowl. You’ve seen his work by now, right? https://davidffisherblog.wordpress.com/

dave-fisher-duck-bowl
Dave Fisher
dave-fisher
Dave Fisher

Jarrod Stone Dahl’s birch work. My 2nd one of his, this one is a birch sleeve, slipped off the log intact. That forms the inside, then it’s wrapped with a sheet of bark that is joined together with the decorative interlocking tabs. https://www.instagram.com/jarrodstonedahl/

jarrod-closed
Jarrod Stone Dahl
jarrod-open
Jarrod Stone Dahl

A small eating spoon by Derek Sanderson – in cherry. Derek can stop himself.. https://www.instagram.com/dcsandersoninc/

derek-sanderson
Derek Sanderson

While looking a few things up for this post, I found this video from Taljfest, by Niklas Karlsson – here’s his Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/_ahardslojdlife/

Thanks for posting it Niklas, I got to see stuff I missed!

the rest of my teaching schedule for 2016

An update about classes remaining for 2016, and slightly beyond.

spoons & bowl

First up is spoon-carving at Lie-Nielsen, on Sept 24 & 25 https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/126

hatchet

I have lots of new tricks I learned at Spoonfest and Täljfest, so come to Maine & we’ll explore all kinds of ideas. I also have some new spoons by outstanding makers to study, as well as a couple old ones.

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October begins with the opening of the full-tilt chest class at Bob Van Dyke’s Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/class-schedule/29-speciality-weekend-classes/534-build-a-17th-century-joined-chest-with-peter-follansbee.html    We did this last year, one-weekend-a-month, for five months. One by one, students from last year have finished their chests, here’s one from Dwight Beebe:

This class is the best way to learn all the steps in making a joined chest with drawer.

This year, we’ll include a trip down to the Yale University Furniture Study, to examine the chest we’ll base ours on. Riving, hewing, planing, joinery, carving – the whole thing. One weekend at a time. First class is coming up, Oct 1 & 2.

—–

Later in October, we’ll do the riving class with Plymouth CRAFT – right now we don’t have it listed yet, but a weekend in October, I think the 15/16 . (I’ll post it here, and Plymouth CRAFT will send out its email as well, if you’re not on their list, you want to be, even if it’s just for Greenwood Fest next year! http://www.plymouthcraft.org/  )

UPDATE: Here is hurdlemaking: http://www.plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=riving-now-two-days
We are excited to be returning to the wonderful venue we used for Dave Fisher’s bowl carving class in July. That massive marsh should be gorgeous in the autumn light.

shaving

In this class, we split apart an oak log, learning how to “read” the log for best results. Then using a froe, we further break the stock down, and make garden hurdles. So, riving, hewing, shaving at a shaving horse, mortising – a busy weekend full of old techniques still applicable today.

test fit

THEN – Paula Marcoux reminded me about the spoon carving at Plymouth CRAFT on Dec 10 & 11,  at Overbrook house in Buzzard’s Bay, Massachusetts.

stay tuned to Plymouth CRAFT for details… http://www.plymouthcraft.org/

UPDATE: And here is spoon carving: http://www.plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=spoon-carving-with-peter-follansbee
For this one we’ll be back at our beloved winter home, Overbrook House. Always cozy; always fun.

Sweden trip, part 2

Sweden.

fuku

Too much happened there for me to write the whole thing down. After Täljfest,  Jögge Sundqvist led a few of us on a mini-tour of parts of Sweden. We were me, Jogge, Del & Mary Stubbs and Masashi Kutsuwa and his wife Madoka and their daughter Fuku. Jogge kept things beyond interesting.

First stop – I have no pictures I can share with the blog – a storehouse for the Nodiska Museet (Nordic Museum for some of  us) – absolutely mind-boggling array of wooden objects. I don’t remember seeing anything that was un-decorated. (the website for the museum down in Stockholm, which can’t possibly compare to its storage collections http://www.nordiskamuseet.se/en  – better to work through this site, which can be sorted by object, collection & more http://digitaltmuseum.se/  )

An evening with Anja Sundberg and her family, her work is amazingly personal, and lively. She almost couldn’t be harder to find on the internet, Robin Wood wrote about her work some time ago. http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/10/26/anja-sundberg/#lightbox/9/

Next morning, a stop for breakfast with Nicke Helldorff, among other things, a carver of birds. http://handochtanke.se/ommig.aspx

nikki & magpie
Nicke Helldorff
nikki's grebes
grebes

Then, Hans Karlsson’s shop, http://www.klensmide.se/?pid=47e92d9a963a9&lang_id=sv   where we all had fun (& Hans’ cherry pie) watching Del go out of his mind comparing notes and techniques with Hans, Mats, Johan, Andreas and Ludwig.

Del Stubbs & Hans Karlsson
Del Stubbs & Hans Karlsson
hooks
people are waiting for these…

When we arrived, there were three flags outside the shop – US, Sweden & Japan. They had to make the Japanese flag, couldn’t find one to buy!

H Karlsson klensmide

That night, we stayed with Ramon & Marie Persson. http://www.ramonpersson.se/  He was patient enough to show us his birch cannister work, while several of us clicked away with cameras.

ramon birch cannisters

cutting tabs

folding in

A really nice old shaving horse at Ramon’s shop:

old shaving horse

shaving horse detail

The next morning, as we were trying to leave, out came the box of antique spoons!

old spoons
old spoons
ramon's spoons
Ramon’s spoons

Then on to a house museum with the most astounding collection of carved work. Sophia Isberg carved vessels to hold cigars, of all things. But the carvings she did rendered them into a sphere all their own. http://www.motalamuseum.com/utstallningar/index.html 

jogge mary & del w carvings
Jogge, Mary & Del looking at some of Sophia Isberg’s carvings
carving detail
detail of one base

carving detail 3

A stone overmantel dated 1662, for the 17th-century enthusiasts :

stone mantle carving

stone mantle pt 2 1662

After that, to Öland. Another post for that leg of the trip.

 

Täljfest at Sätergläntan

I left Spoonfest as soon as the dust settled – off to the airport to get over to Sweden so we could start all over again. Täljfest featured a similar format; 3-day “pre-fest” courses, then an influx of more carvers and instructors for the actual festival itself. My first trip to Sweden – it was pretty exciting.

Sätergläntan http://www.saterglantan.com/ is a magical place Beautifully inspiring buildings, contents and people, nestled into the woodsy hillsides. When I left home, temperatures had been in the low 90s (around 32/33C) and in Sweden, I could have used a sweater at times. When I spoke to the kids back home, I told them it was nice October weather!

saterglantan main building
Sätergläntan

There were several courses running at once; I saw next to nothing of them, being busy with mine. JoJo Wood was doing her masterclass on eating spoons; Beth Moen worked a group through her bowl carving; I did the 17th-century carving designs, and the other class was figure carving with Joohyun Im & Hyungjun Yong of South Korea.

In the festival itself – it was, like Spoonfest, an embarrassment of riches – inspiring craftsmen & women everywhere you turned. Also like Spoonfest, I know I’ll miss some names. Magnus Sundelin again, Fritiof Runhall carving spoons, Del Stubbs http://www.pinewoodforge.com/index.html all over the place!, Jonas Als http://www.woodcraftbyjonasals.dk/ Jarrod Stone Dahl https://www.instagram.com/jarrodstonedahl/;  Barn Carder https://www.instagram.com/barnthespoon/ ; Masashi Kutsuwa https://www.instagram.com/masashi_kutsuwa/ with his green woodworking in Japan, also his wife Madoka with her Urushi lacquer work; Jane Mickelborough https://www.instagram.com/janespoons/ presented some of her research into Breton spoon history, Niklas Karlsson https://www.instagram.com/_ahardslojdlife/ on spoon carving; Vesa Jussila, carving birds, but more importantly, showing me local birds https://www.facebook.com/Vesa-Jussila-Naturdiorama ;

It was crazy – I saw very little of it. I did wander around some, seeing people carving everywhere. On the last afternoon, there was a panel discussion, led by Jögge Sundqvist, about craft in our respective countries – we had Denmark, Japan, US, UK, Sweden all represented. JoJo’s biggest challenge was to speak without profanity, and she aced it.

Lots of pictures, I’ll just add captions.

del stubbs
Del Stubbs presenting his fan bird demo
del's birds
Del’s bird – mind bogglingly good
gouge drawer
each tool has a number, and each slot a corresponding number
jojo demo
JoJo with a spoon carving demo
on my windowsill in my room
on the windowsill in my bedroom
outside the woodshop area
from the woods, looking back to the woodshop
tools
one of the tool cabinets
fritiof's class
Fritiof’s spoon class

This one gets a sentence of its own – this man is Claude Veuillet, one of the co-authors of a great study of Swiss chests &  boxes. One of my students from Spoonfest, Helen, came to Taljfest too, and spoke fluent French. So she helped Claude & I get acquainted. Thanks, Helen.

claude better

Here’s the book – and a post I wrote about it way back https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2014/03/09/i-havent-forgotten-about-furniture/

The dining hall is particularly inspiring.

birch w paint
birch cannister. I don’t even drink tea, but had to look at it in detail
bengt lidsttrom bowl
Bengt Lidstrom bowl
partial spread of food
the place is headquarters for woodenware

 

blue chair
nice blue chair outside the room I taught in

 

bla salen
Bla Salen, door frame also by Bengt Lidstrom, painted door by another hand

My thanks to all those who worked & attended the event. And to Jogge Sundqvist & Beth Moen for including me.

Here’s a link to some photos from Saterglantan:

http://www.saterglantan.com/samarbete/taljfest-2016-album/

Spoonfest 2016

I’m back home from 3 1/2 weeks over in England and Sweden. Lots to catch up on, I’ll start with Spoonfest. But first, I said many times while I was there, that no blog post, video or anything else can convey the feeling being at this event. If you get a chance, just go. I was amazed in every way; by the folks running it – Robin Wood & Barn Carder; along with a host of support staff & amazingly good volunteers, both young & old. The attendees worked as hard as anybody much of the time…

spoonfest

This was year 5 for Spoonfest, and it moved to a new venue, about a 5-minute walk from the original site, so they tell me. This one was great, a huge field for camping, carving, eating around the fires – and above at the top of the field, two long stone barns for the classes. During the festival there are many 90-minute classes that serve as “taster” sessions. There were often 8 of these going on at one time! that’s around 80 people chopping away in unison. First, they post the offerings on a blackboard. People line up in the morning (queue, in British) and patiently wait to sign up for classes. It works amazingly well. Not sure how this would fly in the US – I tried to teach those in the back of the queue to create panic & tension, by shouting & shoving…it was no use.

making it up
checking the board to see what’s available

a partial view of the inside of the barn, just as some classes were beginning.

partial overview

down by the woodpile – there were always people here, either carving, talking – or helping you choose some great wood.

woodpile

Under these tarps (not sure what they are in British English) were benches, chopping blocks, fires, and people carving almost all the time.

under the tarps

This table was unbelievable. The spoons-for-sale table. This is a FRACTION of what ended up there. Staggering. Hanging around this table cost me some money, but made me some too…

fraction of spoons

When you got overwhelmed with inspiration, you could just step back & enjoy the view. Edale is really something.

field & hills

Part-way up one of the hills.

long view

My view is that the event is about people – I said a number of times, it was as if the internet came to life. There were so many people to meet, there’s no way I can get them all. Plus I took lousy photographs. Here’s a few that I happened to have photos of.  Barn, aka Barn the Spoon. what fun to get to spend time with Barn. He & I sorted out the world while others stayed up through the nights quenching thirsts.  https://www.instagram.com/barnthespoon/

barn

Magnus Sundelin https://www.instagram.com/sloydmagnus/ Magnus is the man, plus, like me, he hates the Beach Boys’ music.
magnus

Fred Livesay https://www.instagram.com/hand2mouthcrafts/ There is no one like Fred. he might have made the first 2 spoons of Spoonfest this year. I look forward to seeing him in Minnesota next spring.

fred livesay

Steve Tomlin https://www.instagram.com/stevetomlincrafts/  For someone who would rather be cutting the grass, Steve is a great spoon carving teacher.

steve tomlin

Among others that came to life – JoJo Wood of course, https://www.instagram.com/jojowoodcraft/ and Jarrod Stone Dahl. https://www.instagram.com/jarrodstonedahl/ The three of us were on the circuit this season; Greenwood Fest, Spoonfest and Taljfest.  Jarrod still is on the road…

Alexander Yerks – had so much fun he hasn’t come back to the US yet! https://www.instagram.com/ale_axe/   I got to meet Jan Harm ter Brugge http://www.houtvanbomen.com/HoutvanBomen/Produkten.html   I knew of his Wille Sundqvist connection, plus we have mutual friends. It was great to meet him finally. Jane & Peter Mickleborough https://www.instagram.com/janespoons/ (a treat, saw them in Sweden too…) Martin & Jon Hazell – I had several nice chats with both of these guys. Saw Richard Law there – 2 summers in a row, Richard – https://www.instagram.com/yellowcyclist/ 

The volunteers who fed us, chopped, cut & fetched wood and helped make sure us newcomers had what we needed – Harry, Tom, Nicki, Ria –  I know there’s more – but they really were great. Just fabulous workers, and nice people.

And Robin Wood of course. I have no pictures of him this time. He straddled the edge the whole time, and seemed to calmly keep things going. He & Barn are yin & yang of festival organization.

And many, many more. Sorry to make a partial list. It’s not a slight. I have to get to sleep.

 

there are no truths….

flick o the chip

Joshua Klein sent me a note, asking my take on his recent blog post about “real craft” and what that term means. http://mortiseandtenonmag.com/blogs/blog/thoughts-on-real-craft

The first half of his post follows the term, from Jarrod Stone Dahl, back to Robin Wood, who got onto it from an exhibition with that title by someone named Chris Eckersley. I won’t repeat all that here – it’s easy enough for you to read Klein, Stone Dahl & Wood to get the background. One thing I’ll start in with is that all three of these people are friends of mine…and I don’t usually get involved in this sort of stuff. But the heat has fried my brain, and I have a trip to prepare, so there’s stuff I’m avoiding.

Going back & reading Robin’s thoughts, his concentration is mostly about the use of machinery vs “hand” work. He chooses to skip past the “art vs craft” thing. Robin has spent a lot of time in recent years making spoon carving knives; so he knows the ins & outs of factory work…and has interesting thoughts on how work like that can be equally rewarding as handwork, as long as the machines do not take away the skill required by the workman.. I certainly won’t argue with the notions Robin puts forth. That sort of work holds no interest for me

The part I didn’t see discussed much is, if one thing is “real” craft, then something else must be “unreal” craft, or, perhaps, “fake” craft.

One thing Joshua cited was Eckersley stating  that craft is “real” in the sense that it “occurs in the real everyday world, and not in a fine art studio, nor at a heritage site, nor as a hobby or pastime”. Well…that just hits me wrong. This week, we’ll have a short visit from our  friend the painter Heather Neill as she comes north for her exhibition on Martha’s Vineyard. Why Eckersley thinks an artist’s (fine art) studio is not the “real everyday world” is not explained, at least in Joshua’s excerpt. Maybe it is in Eckersley’s exhibition. Heather works harder than me at her “craft” by a long shot. Her head is filled with decades’ worth of projects/paintings/ideas. And each year, she sits at her easel and produces astounding work. So because it’s what one curator once called “flat stuff” i.e. paintings, it’s not craft, it’s art. I guess. http://heatherneill.com/studio-blog/2016/07/18/granary-gallery-2016/

Flying Horses
Heather Neill’s painting “flying horses”

And “heritage sites” – I guess I worked for twenty years making furniture in one. It’s true that in that setting, I had the benefit of a regular paycheck that was not tied to my output. I had to be on the site, working, and explaining to the museum’s visitors what I was making. That kind of repetition and continuum gave me an experience it would be hard to replicate in Eckersley’s “real” world.

When I hear Jarrod talking about “real” craft on his blog or his Instagram postings, to me his use of the term sounds as if it is about marketing, I see him educating would-be customers about the quality and integrity of his work. (I’ve bought work from him, it’s good stuff.) And such a move makes perfect sense, Jarrod puts a lot of thought into marketing his work. I stink at marketing – it holds little interest for me. http://woodspirithandcraft.com/

IMG_3023.jpg
Jarrod’s work in birch bark

When Joshua picks up the thread and brings his views into it, all kinds of fun begins. He “state(s) the obvious: craft implies tradition.” His words, his emphasis. I don’t necessarily understand why or how that’s obvious. Nor do I think it’s true. To me, craft/crafted means made by someone – the action of someone making things. Pretty broad definition.  

 

Joshua’s bench top

“Traditional” is one of those terms that means one thing to one person, something else to another. I make 17th-century style furniture, using only hand tools – but some of mine are now/have always been, more modern versions of period tools. I know I have used the term “traditional” before, I might still. But I’m nowadays pretty careful with the use of words like that – because of their shifting and varying meanings. Or perceived meanings.

The whole hand-tool versus machine debate is a large part of Joshua’s writings on the subject. Another thing I stay away from. I don’t want to work wood with machines. I am writing this blog post on a machine – and I like to do that…but for me personally, I like working wood with hand tools. That includes hewing, sawing, planing, mortising – all the stuff that happens in the shop. I have a neighbor who came by every so often while my friend Pret & I were framing the shop. He kept saying to me, in all seriousness, “I have a tablesaw you can borrow..” and I don’t-know-what-other tools he had. I started to wonder if he thought I didn’t know about these tools, or was somehow too broke to acquire them, or what he might have thought about why I wasn’t using them. He couldn’t fathom that I enjoyed doing it this way.

bevel down chisel

I don’t own a chainsaw, but I really like it when other people cut the logs I want to length with one. Then I can take it from there. I have cut trees by hand, and done the whole job – felling, crosscutting, splitting & hauling. I have also used a chainsaw at my old job. When they are right, they are a great tool. When they are cantankerous, they are a nuisance. To me, damned if you do, damned if you don’t. I don’t cut a lot of logs in a year. I have a 14’ oak, now all split into sections, that should carry me well into next winter now. So a couple times a year, I prevail on someone…then it’s quiet. Joshua discusses the approach that uses machinery to rough out the wood, then handtools to produce the final surface. A lot of people work that way, and it’s none of my business. What other people do is up to them. Means nothing to me.

[there’s lots of comments on Joshua’s post, including one from Jarrod about “continuum” – a nice take. Jarrod emphasizes utilitarian function – which some might hear the wrong way and think it excludes decoration. I know in Jarrod’s case that’s not true, (I’m expecting delivery any day now of one of his birch cannisters, decorated with punches and pigments). When reading about furniture, I am always keeping my ears up for the “utilitarian = no decoration” crowd!]

I keep going back to what is un-real craft? I thought of a much-hated example, cute little paintings on old handsaws. What could be worse? Lots of things, but it’s a pretty bad example that will do for now. So one thought is that my hand-made, museum-quality reproduction furniture is “real” craft, and the painted handsaw is unreal craft. My outlook on these things is a bit different. I don’t care what other people do. It could be that the handsaw-painting artisan is achieving a near blissful state of Buddha-hood while engrossed in their work for all I know. In which case, who am I to say my work is real and theirs is not? To me it’s about the process, and more importantly, about how I want to spend my days. Which brings me back to Henry David Thoreau by way of Bob Dylan.

Picture1

I’ve told this story many times, but here goes again. Once, back at my old job, I had a young kid, maybe 10 years old, come into my shop and ask me “Do you have anything here that’s 3D?” The room was crammed with piles of wood, tools, furniture in various stages of completion. As far as I could tell, everything in the room was three-dimensional. I told him I didn’t quite understand, and asked if he could ask his question another way. “You know, it looks really real” he said. Which took me back to the existential days of the ‘60s – when Dylan sang “the princess and the prince discuss what’s real and what is not…” (I didn’t get to it til the 70s, but no matter). So I was thinking the other day about what’s real and what is not, and I pulled up Bringing It All Back Home, and listened – and heard another line from the Gates of Eden – “I try to harmonize with songs the lonesome sparrow sings…”

Dylan’s line about harmonizing reminded me of this section seen on the blog before (when discussing Jarrod, interestingly) from Thoreau.

“One-eyed John Goodwin, the fisherman, was loading into a hand-cart and conveying home the piles of driftwood which of late he had collected with his boat. It was a beautiful evening, and a clear amber sunset lit up all the eastern shores; and that man’s employment, so simple and direct, – though he is regarded by most as a vicious character, – whose whole motive was so easy to fathom, – thus to obtain his winter’s wood, – charmed me unspeakably. So much do we love actions that are simple. They are all so poetic. We, too, would fain be so employed. So unlike the pursuits of most men, so artificial or complicated. Consider how the broker collects his winter’s wood, what sport he make of it, what is his boat and hand-cart! Postponing instant life, he makes haste to Boston in the cars, and there deals in stocks, not quite relishing his employment, – and so earns the money with which he buys his fuel. And when by chance, I meet him about this indirect and complicated business, I am not struck with the beauty of his employment. It does not harmonize with the amber sunset.”

I’ll take either one, the sparrow’ song, or the amber sunset. I don’t care what people call my craft, or theirs. What I care about is how I spend my days. I try to harmonize…    

DSC_0077
it’s a sunrise, but similar to a sunset