Spoons for sale, Nov 2016

I read somewhere that I haven’t been doing much woodworking lately! And I kept thinking about this all season, as I worked on building a shop by hand. Certainly, 2016 has been a slow year for me, furniture-wise and woodenware-wise. And the spoons are really something that fell by the wayside. Turns out carpentry makes me more tired than joinery. So I only have a few spoons for sale right now. I did update a page of a few furniture items I have available for sale – including 2 boxes and a stool at reduced prices. A couple of these are stuff that there’s no room for in the new workshop; two things are from around the house. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/furniture-for-sale-fall-2016/

I’m slowly getting back to making custom furniture, in my typical carved oak style. Feel free to contact me if you’re looking for something like that. I also hope to add one-on-one student sessions here. More on that to come.

Here’s the spoons for sale – paypal works the easiest, I can send you an invoice. Just leave a comment if there’s a spoon you want. Prices include shipping in US, outside the states, I’ll add something for shipping. If you would rather, you can send a check. Just let me know…

I forgot to mention, Maureen has some new stuff on her etsy site too – https://www.etsy.com/shop/MaureensFiberArts

thanks,
Peter Follansbee

 

Spoons for Sale

Spoon 01 –  SOLD

serving spoon, made from an English wood, maybe Rowan.

L: 9 1/2″

$75.

spoon-nov-01

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Spoon 09 – apple – SOLD

another in a long series of odd-ball spoon-ish sculptures. This was made during a demonstration, and I didn’t have enough wood with me. This branch was quite weird, and I had to really work at it to get a spoon out of it!

L: 12″

$70

spoon-nov-09

THE SPOONS BELOW HERE ARE SOLD AS OF WEDNESDAY NOV 30. I HOPE TO FINISH SOME MORE IN THE NEXT WEEK AND POST THEM RIGHT AWAY. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT. 

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Spoon 02 – birch serving spoon. SOLD

L: 11″

$80

spoon-nov-02

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Spoon 03 – SOLD

This small server might be rowan also. I started several spoons while I was in England, finished them here. Lost track of which wood was which.

L: 9 3/4″

$70

spoon-nov-03

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spoon-nov-04

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Spoon 05 – SOLD

this extra long cooking spoon is from an apple tree right here in my yard.

L: 15″

$90

spoon-nov-05

spoon-nov-05-detail

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Spoon 06 – willow – SOLD

my favorite spoon of the batch. Fred Livesay split a crook of willow right when we got to Spoonfest in England, and it was too thick for what he wanted. So he split it again, and handed me this small section to carve. Thanks, Fred.

L: 8″

$75

spoon-nov-06-side

spoon-nov-06-overall

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Spoon 07 – SOLD

rowan or cherry

Another hard wood serving spoon.

L: 9 3/4″

$75

spoon-nov-07

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Spoon 08 – apple – SOLD

A nice little crook for a spoon.

L: 8″

$70

spoon-nov-08

spoon-nov-08-overall

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inspired by students

I did some carving today, in white pine, for window trim in the workshop. The pattern I cut was inspired by the students in the joined chest class at Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. This design has been evolving for a while now, I wrote about the basic version of this pattern five years ago  https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/patterns-patterns/  This one has the additional step of hollowing the surface, and then doubling up the design.

double-braid

We carved single rows of this in the class, then first one, then another student asked about doubling them up. So I copied them in this case…Here’s some of what I did. The outline is based on margins and horizontal centerlines. I mark off the spacing with a compass, and strike a punch to give me a starting point for the pattern. Then I strike the arcs with a large, #7 gouge. For the doubled braid, the first rows of strikes look like a stack of curved Vs or seagulls…

first-cuts

Then I turn the gouge around, and strike going the other way, toward the outer margins.

flip-gouge

After the vertical strikes, I angle the tool downwards a bit, and remove a crescent chip.
chips

After this step, it now looks like a stack of handlebar mustaches.

 

stack-of-mustaches

Then I go at it some more with the large #7, and begin to connect the arcs…

large-gouge

A shallow #5 gouge snips out some areas between the arcs, making space for some shadows.

5-gouge

Then I used a #8 gouge to hollow the flat parts that remain…this cut is a pivoting quarter-arc…over & over.

hollow-w-gouge

hollow-pt-1-done

some go this way, some go that way…

hollowing

I shot some short video of carving some of this pattern. No edits, some fumbling around is included.

cutting braid from Peter Follansbee on Vimeo.

 

hollowing braid from Peter Follansbee on Vimeo.

a few more old drawings

here’s a few more of those old drawings from the other day. There isn’t much of a story behind them, but such as it is is in this link: https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/old-drawings-i-just-found-again/

oak paneling from the Guildhall in Exeter:

exeter-guildhall-paneling

“lower part of a Spanish desk, walnut”

spanish-desk

Upholstered chair, red velvet & embroidery

upholstered-chair

two chairs from the V&A:

va-chair

old drawings I just found again

I feel like I’m moving. I guess I am…I’ve been sifting through boxes of stuff that I stashed almost 3 years ago when I moved out of my old shop. The new one is nearing completion, so I keep sorting boxes…

 

english-paneling

People give me stuff every now & then, and somewhere along the line I got these small drawings. I forget who gave them to me. I scanned a few of them tonight. I don’t usually work from this sort of drawing, but I appreciate the skill that it takes to make them. They’re quite nice.

this first batch are all (except the cane chair) about 5″ x 7″ – but they’re not from one notebook, so the sizes vary. one seems like it says “drawn by C. M. Bill. I scanned them & darkened them a little…some are marked either “Albert & Vic” or “Al & Victoria” – thus the V&A in london…others are unmarked as to what collection they’re drawn from…

overmantel

table-base

v-a-childs-chair

the cane chair drawing is 6 3/4″ x 10 1/4″.

cane-chair

There’s about 10 more. I’ll scan those some point soon.

moving in

more pictures. the floor to the shop is more than 2/3s done, today I moved the main tool chest into place. I made this chest after Chris Schwarz’ book came out about his tool chest. There are links at the bottom of this post about building it, and painting it.

I took some photos as I put some of the tools back inside. Here is the chest in its new place, to the right of my workbench.

tool-chest

when I fitted the interior drawers, the runners I made were leftover carvings. Perfect quartered oak.

carvings

the bottom drawer is the deepest, has some backsaws & a plane on one end…

bottom-drawer

and a box-within-a-box of gouges on the other. Back in 2012 when I made this chest, I had cut some dovetails, but not enough to get efficient. This chest and its related tool trays/boxes got me plenty of practice. Here are the bowl-gouge boxes – the small one fits into the larger, deeper one:

box-in-a-box

box-in-box-carving-tools

and then the whole thing fits into the deep tray in the chest:

in-situ

shallower trays go above this one. Starting with this chisel-tray. Some spokeshaves in it are bound for new placement soon…once I finish working on the shop.

chisel-drawer

my main carving gouges go in the top tray, along with some small stuff that fits there alongside them…

carving-tools

molding planes went in before the trays – bench planes will fit in the front floor…

molding-planes

There’s a saw till in front, this Disston saw, made for A.J. Wilkinson Co, sits in there, with others…

wilkinson-saw

wilkinson-saw-handle

Later, I added some junk to the underside of the lid – marking tools, squares, some bits:
open

Like this:

 

bits-awl-etc

Then, the door-hanger came, so I switched gears. More later. Tomorrow, threshold and spandrels.

door-hanger

I mostly watched, as Pret hung the door. so I got out the camera & shot some raking light…

raking-light

and Daniel’s sign he put on the shop’s peak:

work

It was going to say “Workshop” but he ran out of room…

work-detail

Here’s more about the chest, back when I was making it.

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2012/02/01/slow-going-on-the-paint-work/

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2012/01/18/a-solution-to-too-much-blank-space/

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2012/01/19/another-day-of-painting/

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2012/01/12/it-was-the-rust-that-got-me/

 

 

11 months have gone by…

east-end
weather schmeather

It’s coming on a whole year I’ve been building the workshop. I hope to finish just under that measure.

Lately it’s been windows – 15 windows in a building 12 feet by 16. It’s like I’m Tom Lie-Neilsen or something. They’re all in now, keeping out the dreadful wind and rain.

I’ve been making frames, (Justin Keegan made the first batch) fitting old sash to said frames, and trimming them inside & out. Work I know nothing about. Once I got going, I only had to re-do a small percentage of the work each day…Still more battens outside, some trim framing here & there inside. The battens need doing, the trim can wait til a bit later.

I did get to use planes a good bit, a relief from hammers, screwdrivers, etc. Reminded me of joinery.

plow-filetster

With that many windows, there’s lots of light. Here’s an old box, fresh out of a 2-year stint in storage.

raking-light

raking-light-box-front

More pictures. The place is still a jumble, but each day it looks different. After this next photo, I cleaned it out. The floor is next, so I needed to get stuff out of there. Here, looking past the lathe, towards the river. In this photo, the lathe is just a place to pile junk.

river-end-mess

Turning around, looking the other way, towards the door. Loft above. Main bench on our left.

door-view-longer

 

more raking light.

more-rake

begun hanging things here & there. Some will move when I find out they’re in the wrong spot. 

window-untrimmed

As soon as the loft was done, it got filled. A couple of times. Here’s loft-left:
loft-left

And loft-to-the-right:

into-the-loft

There’s carvings scattered around the outside too. Mostly under the window frames, but the red-painted one got temporarily hung above where the door will go. When the door goes in, it will come down to get trimmed, then re-hung.

temporary

A recent one under one of the front windows.
window-trim

Today I started working on the floor boards. Two layers of 7/8″ white pine. Insulation underneath. First, I’ve been cutting tongue-and-groove joints on the finish floor boards. Bought this really nice pair of planes from Patrick Leach. All I had to do was sharpen them.

tg-planes

A test-run.

tg-sample-two

The floor boards are 16′ long. Got to work both edges of 18 boards. I’ll walk some ways in this task, but what fun. The near end of the board sits in a notched stick held in the end vice. It works.

board-planing

 

 

 

two New Haven Colony chests at Yale

carpentry, carpentry, carpentry. I’m thrilled to be making my own workshop, but I’m sick of it. I decided that carpentry is a lot like joinery, just done in uncomfortable positions, and I drop stuff more in carpentry. I can’t wait to be back at the bench full-tilt.

yale-19302265-overall
Meanwhile, I got to go with Bob Van Dyke to the Yale Furniture Study recently in preparation for the joined chest class we’re doing at the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. I’ve been very fortunate over the years to get to handle a lot of period furniture; studying the details. It’s still always fun to go over these things. It sounds like an old cliche, but you really do see new stuff with each visit.  The Furniture Study is a great place, one of my favorite stops on the early oak circuit. http://artgallery.yale.edu/furniture-study  The staff there are very helpful, great scene altogether.

We focused on two chests, the one above and this probably related one.

yale-chest-overall

Typical frame & panel format, all oak in both cases. No secondary wood. Here’s some details:

The panels and muntins on the first chest. Scratch-stock moldings; interrupted where the muntins meet the rails.

yale-19302265-front-panel

This one features a paneled lid. The long rails on the lid alternated how they meet the “stiles” – at the back of the lid, the rail is between the stiles, at the front, the stiles join into the rail. Trickier to layout than one that’s symmetrical.

 

yale-19302265-lid-and-rear

Nobody spent much time working the backs of these chests. Hatchet, and a little bit of planing. Not much.

yale-19302265-rear-detail

The other chest is quite similar, but has some distinctions too. Narrower framing parts for one. Here’s the interrupted molding again, and the panel carving using the S-scroll rather than the “double-heart” motif.

yale-195068-detail-panel

This lid is 3 boards, edge jointed together. Very heavy. 2nd set of hinges. Note the molding around the panels on the inside of the rear framing. You don’t see this once you fill the chest with linens. Till is missing, you still see the trenches and hole for it on our right…

yale-195068-inside-2

I often find holes in the carved panels, which are presumed to be for nailing the panel down while carving it. (on the double-heart motif detail, if you click that photo to enlarge it, you can see some of these holes)  This one has a broken-off nail still in it. See, something new all the time…

yale-195068-nail-in-panel