oak and birds

This weekend we worked on the joined chest project at Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. I’ll write a post about it tomorrow, but in the aftermath of that weekend, I had a few wide oak panels to rive out for planing this week. As they were busted from the log, they were grossly thick for one panel, but most were too thin at the inside edge for two. This calls for some tricky froe-work.

these bolts were 22″ long or so. and in this photo, just over 13″ wide. This one was thick enough to split in two, one panel might come out just narrower than 12″ = once I hew & plane them, they’ll be in the range of 3/4″ thick.

two wides

 

The others weren’t quite the same original thickness, so I had to split them off-center. This gets one wide panel, and one narrower panel. It saves wood, saves hewing, and is all-around well worth it. When it works. Below you see I’ve driven the froe in parallel to the wide face, but it doesn’t reach all the way to the inner edge. To split successfully this way requires the straightest grain, and most agreeable oak. This inner, narrow panel will finish about 6″ or 7″ wide.

extra splits

 

Here’s a detail of how the two panels lie in the oak:
wide & narrow

 

 

I did about four of them this afternoon, while unpacking the car & tools from the weekend. Here’s a detail showing a 14″ panel and its 12″ neighbor.

two parts of one

Once I drive the froe into the split, I jam the bolt in the riving brake – I wouldn’t like to attempt this without one. When it goes right, you hear a SNAP when the froe is twisted and the oak breaks free. I’d only try this on short lengths in these widths.

 

 

off splits

Earlier in the day, look who I found – the redtail hawk from the other day:

flight

 

If we hadn’t seen him drop down to the ground, we’d never have found him among the beat-down grass –

 

 

brunch

 

He caught something there, and we watched him for a while. Then decided to leave him to his brunch… (or her…we don’t know. It is a good size bird, might be female…doesn’t really matter, to me anyway.)

well matched

Later, a kestrel, lousy photo though. Can’t get anywhere near them.

kestrel

ditto for a bluebird.

bluebird

But almost every year about this time, I photograph & post a picture of a snipe. Usually I pair it with photos of the hinges I use for boxes and chests. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2011/12/14/setting-gimmals-you-might-know-them-as-snipe-bills/  (Ahh, that post was from Dec, but I found photos of snipe from April 5, 2013. everything is late this year)

Maureen found this one (then a 2nd one) right in front of us in the blind at the Audubon place where we were walking…

One snipe.

snipe

Two snipes. they blend in more than the hawk did.

snipes

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “oak and birds

  1. Eric – that wasn’t me, it sounds like my friend Joe. But I would have told you the same thing; I got it from Daniel who was pictured using a very tall example in Scott’s book. I know I discuss it in the joined stool book, but I can’t find a dedicated post about it here on the blog. No doubt it’s here, just not tagged as such, so hard to search for. Here it is in a post that has me riving white cedar https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2009/11/19/more-carving-riving-cedar/

    • Thank you for the reply. I have Scott’s book (somewhere). I built my table from plans in it. So I should be all set. Your brake looks like the stout type an old f. . . feller like me needs.
      Regards,
      Eric.

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