what if a chairmaker made spoons?

Curtis' spoon

 

Depends on the chairmaker, I guess. It starts with this spoon that arrived in my mailbox one day. I told you I have a great mailbox. Curtis Buchanan made it; sent it with no note, just the spoon. (great article by & about Curtis in Fine Woodworking recently – glad I stumbled into it)

Then Tim Manney posted stuff on his blog about some whacky idea about making spoon crooks by steam-bending the blanks. http://timmanneychairmaker.blogspot.com/2014/07/a-few-spoons-and-dissection.html

Turns out that’s what Curtis did. And then Tim went totally full-tilt-bozo with the idea. And makes outstanding spoons this way; steam-bent, drawknife, shaving horse. Sounds like chairmakers to me.

Tim's spoon 1

 

tim's spoon bowl

Tim's spoon detail

tim's spoon

Tim gave us a run-down of his techniques. Says it starts with “it’s hard to find crooks” so he makes ’em. Shaved green, tries to follow the growth ring, so very carefully shaved. Then steamed, and clamped to a form for 12 hours.

 

steambent crooks

 

Then, no axe – just goes to the shaving horse and gets his very sharp drawknife and goes to it. He draws the shape on there, and starts in defining the outline of the spoon.

drawknife work 2

 

Here he’s using the drawknife to come down the bowl, towards the neck or stem of the spoon.
drawknife stop cut

 

Next he shaves along the side of the handle, towards the relief cut he just defined. Very precise, deliberate cuts. One false move…

drawknife work

 

Then knife work. He hollows the bowl with a gouge, (see previous post) –

Tmi knife work

 

It’s one of those things that I don’t want to do; but I really admire Tim’s approach and his work. Both are great. It was a real thrill to have Tim around this weekend at Lie-Nielsen, I know the students dug it too.

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7 thoughts on “what if a chairmaker made spoons?

  1. I had the opportunity and privledge to meet and talk extensively with Tim at WIA 2014. So talented and so innovative. And extremely friendly and generous in sharing his knowledge. I can’t wait til I’m up to getting back out in the shop and trying my hand at some steam bent spoons and spatulas. Talking to and learning from Tim was a big part of many things that made WIA 2014 a weekend I’ll never forget.

  2. My friend bought a pancake spatula some time ago. After using it a few times, the spatula lost its curve and was almost straight (not usable anymore for turning pancakes). Looking at the grain, we discovered that the wood was probably steam bent. Maybe these are not suitable as cooking spoons…
    So I wonder… Have you tried using the spoon? What results did you get?

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