I had a few minutes recently to take a quick look at a grouping of 18th-century Dutch planes. Like this:

overview

I have always like these planes since I first saw some 20 years ago on Cape Cod.  Several of this batch are panel-raising planes, most have skewed mouths. And, all are carved. Some better, some pretty good. They often are trimmed at the back end like this one. Makes handling them easier, more comfortable I guess.

 

skewed mouth smooth plane

skewed mouth smooth plane

 

 

sole

sole

This one’s got a straight mouth, longer body than the ones above. Not like a jointer, though…I’d guess about 14″.

 

longer smooth plane

longer smooth plane

better view

better view

 

carved mouth

carved mouth

Here’s a couple of wedges that got away from planes…

carved wedges

carved wedges

One of the original irons, quite thin. Tapered in thickness and width.

iron

iron

Quite thin, not like 19th-century plane irons.

tapered iron

tapered iron

Here’s some of those scroll planes – a “gerfschaaf” in Dutch.  Gerrit van der Sterre says it is sometimes called a “hobbelaar” or “rocking plane.” Says the sole can be straight, hollow or rounded in cross-section, as well as straight or curved lengthwise. Thinks they are for roughing out… these are small. maybe 8″ – 10″ long. Not more…

2 scroll planes

two scroll planes

scroll plane

 

Then the full-blown jointer plane. Munged up a bit, but still a great tool. It makes me want to make one next week – but I have to wait til I finish a bunch of other stuff!

 

 

 

jointer

jointer

tote profile

 

jointer tote

 

 

 

scrolls

Gerrit van der Sterre’s book is called Four Centuries of Dutch Planes and planemakers, published in Leiden by Primavera Press 2001.

Here is a plane from Randle Holme’s Academie of Armory or Blazon, 1688. Showing a Dutch-style plane, used in England. Was it an English style too? Or is it imported, or used by Dutch craftsmen working in England?

smooth plane dutch style

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