Up to Lie-Nielsen and back home

Unloaded some photos off my camera today. Now I see where I’ve been.

After Greenwood Fest, I scooted up for a quick trip to Lie-Nielsen to teach a 2-day class in 17th-century carving. The project is/was a carved box. Most of the emphasis is on the carving.

They’ve moved the classroom there, now using benches back-to-back. Seems like a nice arrangement. 
double bench LN

Dwight got the “coolest shirt” recognition. 

dwight cool shirt

Bill brought an old  brace for show & tell. I have no way to know its age. 17th/18th century? who knows…it’s really well done, no matter when. 
hand forged brace

brace

chuck

I dragged JoJo Wood along. Decorative carving is not her bag, but she took to it like gangbusters. 

jojo carves decoration

jojo carving decoration

She told me Edale is as far from the sea as you can get in England, so after all that time in the car, we had to see some Maine coast. Here’s Owl’s Head

owls head

sunset

Back home I have several things underway. I know this is stupid, but I assembled my workbench inside the unfinished shop. It’s stored here, was going to sit under a tarp, so why not have it assembled? we’ve never really looked at how it’s built – so here is the white pine top, approx. 4″x 17″ x 8′. On an oak frame. Wedged through tenons on the long rails. The frame runs 24″ deep. I have an oak shelf/plank that fills in the space to make up the rest of the bench top.

bench assembly

The front leg at my right hand-end. Holes for holdfast in the leg. A blind tenon at the top of the leg into a mortise in the underside of the bench. It just goes “thunk” and is done. Just 2 mortises in the bench top. It rests on the top edge of the side aprons behind the front legs.

bench end

Before I positioned the back shelf/plank. I have no recollection of why I framed the rear legs the way I did. But the loose block that rests between the back leg and the rear edge of the workbench top is a spacer to support the shelf. Weird, but it works. Once the shelf is in place, I never think about it again.

back leg

shelf is pegged down to the two spacers, and has one registration peg between it & the bench top.

peg

The bench in situ. A sliding deadman occasionally gets some use. Chopping block moves to the left hand end of this view. Now to finish the shop around the bench & lathe.

in situ

 

 

 

 

Jarrod’s new video

My late friend Victor Chinnery once quoted a phrase he read somewhere – “think much, say little, write nothing.” This, 20 years after his book Oak Furniture: the British Tradition. I’ve been thinking of that quote this week.

sycamore

Several years ago, I was a guest on Roy Underhill’s show The Woodwright’s Shop, and for a topic I chose spoon carving. The 24 or 26 minute episode shows me & Roy making spoons, with methods that I was using at the time. I don’t carve spoons in the same sequence now…but that was how I happened to be doing it at that time. http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/watch-on-line/featured-guests/peter-follansbee/

In spring of 2014, I went to Lie-Nielsen to shoot another in a series of videos with them, and we carved spoons. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/book-dvds/

spoon video

That video shows a different sequence from what I did with Roy…and right after shooting that work, I left for a short class in Minnesota with Robin Wood. I got a ride up Highway 61 with Jarrod Stone Dahl, Robin and JoJo Wood. One evening JoJo showed me how she hews the spoon blank from a straight-grained blank, and once again, my techniques adapted. The gist of it is that we all keep learning as we go. Hopefully it never stops.

Now you can see one of my favorite spoon carvers, Jarrod Stone Dahl, show you step-by-step his methods in carving spoons with an axe, knife & hook knife.

 Jarrod’s new video from Popular Woodworking is available now for download or you can order the DVD. I bought mine last night. I’m sure I’ll add some stuff to my spoon carving repertoire. http://www.shopwoodworking.com/the-art-of-spoon-carving-dvd

If you’d like to come carve spoons, (or boxes, etc) my teaching schedule for the first half of 2016 is here: https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2016-teaching-schedule/

 

2016 teaching schedule

I have been slow to post my schedule for 2016, and now I see that it’s almost upon us. So here are some dates for classes and presentations that I have nailed down thus far. this list is through July, then there will be more later. I have classes at the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking, Lie-Nielsen and Roy Underhill’s The Woodwright’s School. Also a couple of weekend classes are on the books with Plymouth CRAFT. Links will take you to the details, if there are any.  

FEBRUARY 13 & 14, 2016.  At Bob Van Dyke’s Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking, I’ll start off with a furniture-carving class,

http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/woodworking-classes.html#Speciality_Weekend_Classes

“Carving in the 17th century style with Peter Follansbee”

This class runs through several exercises, learning about layout, tool selection and use. Over the course of 2 days, we’ll carve a wide range of 17th-century style patterns in oak. Some of the text from Bob Van Dyke’s website:

practice carving
practice carving

“In this two-day course, students will learn the steps and processes used to recreate carving patterns from seventeenth- century furniture of England and New England. Starting with a single gouge and mallet, we will focus on technique and posture. Also considered are proportions, spacing and the relationship between background and foreground in establishing the pattern/design. Each successive practice pattern builds upon the previous example, adding more tools and concepts. We will incorporate hand-pressure, mallet work, and the use of the V-tool in outlining designs. A compass, awl and marking gauge are used to layout the geometric basis for each pattern, but freehand work is included in each as well.”

 

FEBRUARY 20/21 – Plymouth CRAFT has had quite a first year! And we’ll just keep rolling into year 2. I’ll start with – what else? Spoon carving! We just confirmed the booking, so not on the website yet – http://plymouthcraft.org/?post_type=tribe_events – but it’s 2 full days of hewing, knife work and spoon design. At Overbrook House, Bourne Massachusetts. Legendary lunch included.

FEBRUARY 26/27, 2016 – https://www.lie-nielsen.com/hand-tool-events/USA/74

I’ll spend the weekend presenting some green woodworking (spoons, bowls & what else?) at the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event at Goosebay Sawmill, Chichester, NH. I did this show last winter, what a great venue. All those Lie-Nielsen tools, and a sawmill with timbers galore.

aeriel view 2

APRIL 1-3, 2016, back at CVSWW. a 3-day class in making (and carving) a frame & panel. Think of this as a crash course in joiner’s work, using oak, mortise & tenon, and frame & panel construction. Come help freak Bob Van Dyke out with the carvings – 

Follansbee frame and panel UPSIDE DOWN

“Build- and Carve- this Frame & Panel with Peter Follansbee”

In this three day class with joiner & carver Peter Follansbee, students will explore the fundamental aspects of 17th-century joiner’s work. This frame-and-panel project has all the elements of a larger joined chest, but in a scale that fits the time frame. We’ll use oak we rive and plane for the framing parts; and quartersawn stock for the wider panels. Drawbored mortise and tenon joinery and carved decoration will be the a major focal point. A true crash course in joiner’s work. Now, where’d I put that axe?”

[much later in the year, September – Bob & I are planning to repeat out “one-weekend-per-month for X months” joined chest class. The full project, log to chest. Homework, travel, a museum field trip to study originals, this is the whole show. We did it last year with about 9 people whose scars have mostly healed. Dates to be announced as soon as we figure it out. I’d like it to be 5 weekends, but we’ll see. No drawer this time, so fewer pieces to rive & plane.]

APRIL 20-22, 2016, BOWL CARVING – the Woodwright’s School, Pittsboro, NC.  –http://www.woodwrightschool.com/classes/bowl-carving-with-peter-follansbee

Bowl-Carve

Here’s Roy’s text:

“Your instructor, Peter Follansbee, (free range at last!) gnaws woodworking down to the marrow! Celebrate the liberation of our foremost man of organic woodworking with three days of Scandinavian, “upside-down” bowl carving. Starting with a walk in the woods you’ll learn shaping and carving technique from bole to bowl!”

[there is a spoon-carving class before it, but I guess it’s filled. there’s other spoon classes – (Plymouth CRAFT & Lie-Nielsen) or get on the waiting list.]

APRIL 30/MAY 1, 2016 : Plymouth CRAFT again, this time ash basketry.

We did this class this fall, and I was astounded at the students. They whomped on some ash logs and everyone wove a couple of baskets. The baskets are perfect to keep your spoon-carving tools in.

MAY  7/8, 2016 . https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/126  

018c3d1d843780f28aef41e81ece87198b00defca9

May means Maine – up at Lie-Nielsen we’ll be carving spoons.  I’ll be watching birds in the earliest hours, but class doesn’t start til 9. I think I spent 5 weeks in Maine this year, can you tell I like it at Lie-Nielsen?

 

JUN 10-12, 2016  GREENWOOD FEST – http://plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=greenwood-fest-2016 well, this one’s sold out – but there’s a waiting list. A 2 1/2 day lovefest with green woodworking in the pinewoods of Plymouth MA. I’ll be presenting my oak furniture game, but there will be heaps of stuff to do. 8 out of 9 of the instructors carve spoons furiously…

JUNE 18/19 – Another trip down to Maine – for a carved box class at Lie-Nielsen https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/129

here come old flat top

JUL, 2016  – the Lie-Nielsen Open House. I missed it in 2015. Not again! I forget the dates, an early weekend in July.

 

LN Hand Tool Event, Greenwood Fest and general update

DSC_0106

Lots going on around here. Tomorrow I will be at Phil Lowe’s Furniture Institute of Massachusetts for the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event.

I’ll be working on spoons; but I’ll have some hewn bowls and other stuff with me. I have some classes scheduled with LN for next year, and I’ll be posting my teaching schedule here soon. The event at Phil’s runs two days, but I’ll only be there Friday. Have to teach this weekend for my last class of the year, at Plymouth CRAFT. Speaking of which…

 

raking light

The Greenwood Fest 2016 pages on Plymouth CRAFT’s website – there’s one on instructors (still lacking two profiles) and this one that answers some questions about the format and venue. http://plymouthcraft.org/?page_id=2268  And one for the registration which  opens tomorrow at 9AM eastern time. http://plymouthcraft.org/?page_id=2272 There’s a few tabs at the top of the page for Greenwood Fest.

The Greenwood Fest takes up a lot of time in planning, but there’s other stuff going on too. Next week, I’ll have some spoons and things for sale here, probably the last of the year. I’m slow. I have some oak furniture to get back to (wainscot chairs and a chest) and I have also started planning work for my biggest project yet. Can’t wait to have something to show you…

Sloyd w Jogge at Lie-Nielsen

Last weekend was the class Jogge Sundqvist taught at Lie-Nielsen. I managed to stick my nose into it, but did almost no woodwork. Instead, I listened carefully, and tried to get around and see all the students as they worked. I failed in that regard, but there were too many interesting people there!

As always, it was great being there for Jogge’s class. His techniques and skills are extraordinary, but so is his outlook on craft and all its significance. I wish this class had been longer, but I still wouldn’t have seen it all. The class wasn’t about making a spoon, or this or that – but about techniques and the whole outlook Jogge uses in his sloyd work. Reading the trees, and seeing what’s inside them…that sort of thing.

Here. you see what a dull teacher he is, as Geoff Chapman busts open a birch section.

dull jogge

We had great weather, so got to have much of our work outside behind the toolworks. Roy Underhill had sharpened this saw for the LN Open House, so we put it to good use.

i'll be your crosscut saw

Really, Jogge is great & all that – but Kenneth, get up off your knees. It’s not like that!

kenneth off your knees

The class made butter spreaders…I forget whose these are. They aren’t mine, that’s for sure. I started two and am not even sure where they are at this point. They’re great for practicing knife techniques.

some butter spreaders

The other “project”was a decorative distaff, one of the fittings for a linen wheel. Jogge showed us some historical examples that displayed a great array of decoration. To me, they looked like turned things made square…here, Masashi, Kenneth & Eric are looking one over & discussing its features.

masashi kenneth eric w geoff in back

When lining up an auger bit for boring, Jogge suggests getting a photographer to help you sight the angles…(I wasn’t the only one – there were about 4 of us at the same angle)

 

line up the brace & bit

On the 2nd day of class, Drew & Louise Langsner showed up, having come up to Maine ahead of Drew’s class there the following weekend..here they are meeting Dave Fisher.

dave fisher w langsners_edited-1

Dave and Eric Goodson both wrote about the class also –

https://davidffisherblog.wordpress.com/2015/09/29/the-maine-woods/

http://ericgoodson.blogspot.com/2015/09/jogges-crew.html

 

 

 

 

Last Maine trip for 2015

mill pond

I’m just back from two-plus weeks in Maine. Jogge Sundqvist came over from Sweden to teach a 2-day class in the techniques of sloyd; working riven green wood with axe and knife. It’s always greatly inspiring to work alongside Jogge.

outdoor class

I sat on the other side of the monitors while Lie-Nielsen shot a video the week before the class. Then after the class several of us, including Drew and Louise Langsner, took off on a mini-tour of coastal Maine, making several stops including a visit to Dickinsons Reach, the site of Bill Coperthwaite’s home for many decades. Here’s old friends and new: Drew Langsner, Peter Lamb, Louise Langsner, Jogge Sundqvist, Masashi Kutsawa. 

at bill's

It’s nearly 2 years now since Bill’s death, but as a small group of us explored his homesite, his impact was tangible. Jogge found tools and gifts from his father, Wille to Bill, and we spoke at length about the 1976 trip that landed Wille at the Langsner’s home in western North Carolina. Thus began Country Workshops, the school the Langsners have run since about 1977, which is where I met John (Jennie) Alexander in 1980 and Jogge in 1988.

Wille's spoon crook
Thanks to the staff at Lie-Nielsen, all the great students who came from near & far, and our hosts on the tour. More to come. Lots to think about. I have to sort out my desk, pay some bills and tend to some household stuff, then it’s back to woodworking. I’m so full of ideas, I don’t know where to begin.

juvenile red tailed hawk

No woodworking photos lately, too busy. I lost a bunch of time to car-shopping, I finally gave up on my 1999 edition and got a new used car. But as we have been working around the house this summer, we’ve been treated to seeing the red tailed hawks that nest somewhere near here. I have never found the nest, but every year, we meet a new hawk or two. They are particularly visible once they are out on their own, screeching & yelling as if to say “why aren’t you feeding me?” One of the juvies showed up tonight as we sat outside eating our dinner.

 

 

RT hawk Aug

RT Hawk Aug 2

I’m off to Maine on Sunday, teaching a class in bowl carving Aug 29 +30. (video work the week before) Come make bowls that weekend. It’ll be fun. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/71

I’ll bring my binoculars. Who knows what’s around…