shifting to the Greenwood Fest next

carved panel

My days have shifted some, from a focus on the workshop to now a focus on preparation for Greenwood Fest. Time to get some tools & projects together, and after the weekend, time to start moving wood, benches, tools & finally people into the site. The photo above is a carved panel, and one to-be-carved panel for my work at the Festival. I’m going to be working on a joined chest (just the front of it, I expect). Like this one:

white oak chest 2009

I have some great red oak for it, the other day I carved one panel, and the wide center muntin. I’ll carve the rails, stiles and one panel at the event.

carved chest prep

Work on the shop has slowed down now as part of this shift in priority. We got a lot of the sheathing up, leaving openings where the windows will go:

sheathing view 1

The front will have a window on each side of the door, and a pair of them just above. so we did almost no sheathing there yet…just enough to keep it connected to the sills.

sheathing view 2

This side has several windows along it, the one on our left is actually wider than this present opening, we’ll cut some of that sheathing away when the windows go in.

north side

Tucked under the north side of the building is some red oak I just rived for my upcoming class at Lie-Nielsen later this month. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/129

sheathing view front

Here’s a better view of the front. When things settle down a bit, it will be up on the roof – to install red cedar shingles. Right now, the place reeks from these piles of cedar.

red cedar

I want to take a moment to thank all of you who donated towards my building project – with your help I was able to get all the sheathing & shingles to help keep this project moving along. It means a lot to me, the way folks have responded to this work. I can see the inside of the shop in my head, and I can’t wait to show it to you here on the blog.

The sheathing is locally sawn white pine, from Gurney’s, our favorite sawmill down in Freetown Massachusetts – http://www.gurneyssawmill.com/ – sixth generation of a family owned & operated sawmill.

wow that's a load

 

gurney's

 

The shingles were bought locally, but they are western red cedar – I got them from Taylor Forest Products – they treated me very well. Delivery charge was only $10!! How could that be?  http://www.taylorforest.com/application/home/index.aspx

wainscot chair

PF copy KP chair

I finished this wainscot chair and delivered it to the Martin House Farm in Swansea, Massachusetts yesterday. I should say I “completed” the chair, I applied no finish to it. They are looking into having it stained to look like the original. Speaking of  which…

side view chairs

I don’t often get to compare my results to the originals that I study. I sometimes don’t want to see the contrast. It can leave me feeling like I missed some obvious feature, muffed another one, etc. There’s a couple of things I’d do differently next time, but not too drastic.

chairs side by side

I added some height to mine, to bring the seat more level, or slightly canted to the rear. The original tilts forward now.

new & old

The original chair descended in the Cole family in Rehoboth and Swansea. Maybe dates from 165-1700. All oak. Some think it was made in Providence, some think it’s a Plymouth Colony joiner. Hard to say, there’s so little to go on. One very distinctive feature of this chair is the rear of the large panel. Instead of just beveling it to fit, the joiner made a tabled” or raised panel.  Here’s mine before assembly:

back of the back

Unusual in New England wainscots, but very common in Wiltshire, England. I have seen many wainscot chairs there done with a tabled panel in front, then the raised area carved. Here’s one from Salisbury, not a great photo but you can just make out the tabled/molded raised area, then carved.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Salisbury wainscot chair

A post about the raised panel, and the circular decoration on the carved side.

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2016/03/31/the-wainscot-chair-panel-more/

loose ends

The days are flying by, and Greenwood Fest is coming up next. I have been poking away at a few things. The workshop project is moving ahead. We’ve been siding it, once Pret & I figured out window placement. I don’t have any shots of it lately; I’ll get some next time I work on it.

Here’s the bowl horse Pret made for Dave Fisher’s class – we saw this the other day. But on last Saturday, Pret & I got to try it out. Plymouth CRAFT was once again presenting their stuff at Pinefest – http://www.pinebarrensalliance.org/pinefesthome.asp 

bowl horse detail

Here’s Pret using the horse –

pret & bowl horse

and shortly after we started making slight adjustments. We’ll wait for Dave to show us what’s really what with this thing.

1st adjustment

While I was carving spoons at the event, a woman came to tell me about a “Rev war” spoon she had in her collection. She later brought it over and I asked if I could photograph it. It looks like this:

spoon

spoon back

spoon bowl

spoon profile

I was interested because I often wonder “what does an American wooden spoon look like?” –  so I asked what the provenance was, how she knew it was a Revolutionary War-era spoon. Well, she said, her husband’s father was a pattern-maker, and he lived to be 100 years old. So her husband grew up around this sort of thing.

I said nothing. A rare moment…

It’s Daniel’s baseball season again – here is an epic-looking swing, but I think it was a foul ball.

epic swing

I get a good bit of spoon carving in during the batting practice before the games…not only am I the only carver in the stands, I’m the only one I can see doing anything not involving a smartphone. Sad…

the only carver in the stands

 

game spoons
game spoons

And while working on the shop, every day the hawks get harassed & chased. It’s a hard life..

RT hawk 2

RT hawk

hawk & crow

Greenwood Fest is coming right up – 2 new openings

pre leaves pinewoods
one of the pavilions at Pinewoods, before the leaves came out

You wouldn’t know it’s May here in southeastern New England lately – very cool today. But the calendar says May 16th, which means in a few weeks, (3 1/2) several of us will be running around like the proverbial chickens with their heads cut off, getting ready for Greenwood Fest 2016. We’ve never done this before, and it sure has been a learning experience! One thing we’ve learned – get on the waiting list. The event sold out quickly, but that was a long time ago (January) – and for several folks life has intervened, & they have had to give up their seats. That was good news for those on the waiting list. Paula told me today that there’s 2 new slots open now.

pinewoods camp
here it is with some leaves

So if you’ve been wishing you could have made it, you still can. Shift your schedule and head to Plymouth June 10-12. This page in the link says 5 slots, but that’s out of date now. There’s 2.    http://www.plymouthcraft.org/?page_id=2272

While you’re at it, extend your stay and take in Jogge’s class after the main event. The distaff is just the vehicle for practicing the cuts and vocabulary of patterns and shapes. This is Jogge’s only US class this year – and we have 2 spaces left. Somehow I’m going to try to be in 2 places at once during this 2-day class -like that girl in Harry Potter. I’ll check with my kids, maybe they can help me. Otherwise, I’ll be there when I can, because I always learn a lot when I’m with Jogge – his work is like nobody else’s.  http://www.plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=distaff-the-passion-of-carving-with-jogge-sundqvist

Photo by Jögge Sundqvist
Photo by Jögge Sundqvist

jogge

 

 

 

 

here’s where I got this week

working on the shop this week. In this view, you can pretend it’s finished inside. Except if it was, I’d fill it with stuff.

 

looks done

 

I did take one day to re-assemble the lathe, and turn some chair stiles. I hadn’t turned ANYTHING in 17 months! Thus, it went slowly. But this is generally where the lathe will reside; yes – my back to the river view.

temp lathe setup

Here’s about the last time we’ll see this mistake-brace, until the shop is re-sheathed, or taken down.

 

carved brace evidence

We sheathed the corners, so the building wouldn’t float away when we did the roof. Spaces left so we can figure out which windows go where. sheathing begun

from below

Pret has a huge supply of various windows, seemingly all rescued from inevitable trips to dumpsters. so lots of head-scratching to figure which ones where & how.

window shopping

The shop space brings me closer to the birds – here’s one of the spring’s first catbirds in our yard.

 

catbird

and an un-flummoxed chickadee.

chicadee

When he isn’t guiding me through all phases of building the shop, or helping every workshop at Plymouth CRAFT, or playing banjo in the band The Dinghys – Pret Woodburn is doing other stuff. This week, he built a bowl horse for Dave Fisher’s class at Greenwood Fest – just awaits tweaking directions from Dave now. You’ll see Pret at the Greenwood Fest – and you’ll be amazed. He’ll be working with Rick McKee – whom you know but might not know you know – https://blueoakblog.wordpress.com/

bowl horse

 

bowl horse detail

 

detail head etc

 

 

a couple of birds have shown up…hopefully more this week

Spring is slow to come here in southern New England this year. Cool & rainy so far. The birds I saw in North Carolina two weeks ago haven’t made it here yet. But some are trickling in now – of course this turkey is resident, but he’s got his springtime stuff to strut now…

turkey rear view

 

turkey side

 

turkey

The day we saw the turkey we also spotted some newly-arrived purple martins. Soaking wet.

wet purple martins

Then yesterday at home, the sun came out briefly. As I was puttering around the yard, I heard, then found this northern Baltimore oriole. (I didn’t realize it was back to being the Baltimore oriole. Nothing to do with the city, https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole/lifehistory ) Anyway, fresh back from Central America, it’s always a great sight, the first sightings of the spring…

ORIOLE

trip to Roy Underhill’s

barred owl
barred owl “Who cooks for you??”

Some photos from my trip down to the Woodwright’s School & Woodwright’s shop, aka Roy Underhill’s place. Always a highlight of the year. we had a 2-day spoon carving class during which I apparently took zero pictures. so just imagine that class…otherwise, just photos & captions.

one & a half desk boxes
desk box & 1/2 for the show

 

i was here before
I have a feeling I’ve been here before

After rehearsal, we stopped by the school & crashed Tom Calisto’s saw-making class.

one & a half saws
1 1/2 saws
saw handle
a saw handle getting refinements

At the mill, we had 2 days of spoons, then set up for hewing & carving bowls.

katy turns her back
Katy has seen it all before, so she turns her back on the work

 

ready for bowl class
bowls, tools, shrink pots & more at the workshop

 

spread out
out in the country, you can spread the action out…

 

js hewing inside bowl
Janet was a confirmed spoon freak, until she hewed a bowl

 

spokeshave
in town, at the school – with a spokeshave

 

school group
a school group came by, it felt like old times for Roy & me

 

boring shrink pot
boring out for the optional bonus shrink pot project

 

more boring
I prefer this type of auger – here Roy gives it a spin

 

big chips
these chips have some substance

 

view
I can’t wait til my shop looks like this again, except the mini-shaving horse

 

wren of carolina
the Wren of Carolina