Greenwood Fest instructors: Barn Carder

Part of my job in Greenwood Fest is lining up the instructors. In one sense, it’s easy – I write or call some friends and offer them a paying job. It another sense, this round 2 is hard, because I have to leave some people out so we can have some new people in. And which new people? There ain’t enough room for all of us…

We’re very pleased to include Barn Carder this time.

barn-concentrating

 

Here’s the page for Greenwood Fest; http://www.greenwoodfest.org/

Like many of us from the US, I first heard of Barn through Robin Wood’s blog. And last summer I was lucky enough to go over to Derbyshire for Spoonfest, the largest international gathering of spoon carvers. Robin and Barn co-founded Spoonfest. There, I got to meet & spend a good amount of time with Barn. You’re going to love getting to know him. We ask each participant to send us a short blurb about themselves, and everyone who has ever had to write those knows how awful they are. Here’s Barn’s:

“No one in Britain knows more about crafting a spoon from green wood than Barn The Spoon” – The Guardian

Barn really does love spoons, he has been fully immersed in the Wood Culture Renaissance for a while now and there doesn’t seem to be any letting up. Recognised for his unique depth of knowledge, and artisanal approach to production carving. He adapts simple, traditional designs to sell to a modern market. From living in the woods and peddling spoons on foot, to a high street shop in London and setting up The Green Wood Guild he keeps himself busy with fresh wood fibres and sharp tools.

fig-spoon

That’s all well & good – but another element that is missing in that description is humor.  Barn has a great approach to his teaching. He’s really consumed with spoon carving, and has a great willingness to share that passion. His manner and methods are infectious. This will be Barn’s first time teaching in the US, he’ll teach a session before the festival, and be there throughout as well. He has a lot of web presence, so you can find stuff about him, and the Greenwood Guild that he is involved with easily. He’s got an Instagram feed – https://www.instagram.com/barnthespoon/

20150903_barn_the_spoon_woods_099_patricia_niven

But for me, the video clip that best presents Barn is the one he & Robin Wood did for Hole & Corner:

Greenwood Fest 2017

Image may contain: one or more people, tree, outdoor and food

Paula Marcoux has been working like the madwoman that she is, getting the website ready for Plymouth CRAFT’s Greenwood Fest 2017. Last year, we dribbled out announcements about the instructors one-by-one. This year, she’s got it almost all ready to go in one fell swoop. http://www.greenwoodfest.org/

I will write posts about them as we go – for example, Roy Underhill. Do I really need to write about Roy?

roy & shavings 3

For now you can look over the website for the festival, and the SEVEN courses beforehand. Lots of great instructors; a huge pile of wood, this time plenty of coffee, and more fun than you can stand. Registration January 4th.

see you there?

Last spoons for sale Dec 2016 – SOLD OUT.

UPDATE – 

There were only a few spoons available, and they sold out quickly. Thanks to all who support my efforts here, for those who missed out on this batch, there will be more. I’ll try for some soon, but certainly after the New Year. 

thanks again, everyone. 
PF

 

a few last spoons for sale…paypal is simplest. Pick out a spoon, leave a comment & I’ll send an invoice. Prices include shipping in US. Elsewhere will require an additional charge. Finish is flax oil. It’s been fun delving into spoon carving again – building the shop left me little time. That is now changing and I plan on having them for sale regularly again in 2017. Thanks as always for the support.

Dec spoon 1 –  SOLD

birch. A little-big spoon. From a short, but nice crook in a birch limb.

L: 7″ W:  2 3/8″
$60

spoon-dec-1-overall

spoon-dec-1-side

——————–

Dec Spoon 2.    SOLD

Also birch, a great crook that a friend gave me a couple of weeks ago.

L: 9 1/4″  W: 2 1/4″

$75

spoon-dec-2-overall

spoon-dec-2-side

———————-

Dec spoon 3 – SOLD  

birch again. Slightly longer serving spoon/cooking spoon.

L: 9 1/2″  W: 2 1/2″

$70

spoon-dec-3-overall

——————–

Dec spoon 4. SOLD

Cherry, streaky heartwood & sapwood.

L: 10 1/4″  W: 2 1/2″

$75

spoon-dec-4-overall

—————–

Dec spoon 5    SOLD

A longer birch serving/cooking spoon.

L: 12 1/4″   W: 2 3/4″

$80

spoon-dec-5-overall

——————-

Dec spoon 6;   SOLD

cherry. A nice accident; I roughed this spoon out & then lost track of it. Its color deepened over that time to a nice nut-brown.

L:  11 1/2″  W:  3″

$85

spoon-dec-6-overall

spoon-dec-6-side

—————

Dec spoon 7. – SOLD

Cherry again. A huge crook. Some ripples in the grain of the handle. A big spoon.

L:  13 3/4″  W: 3 1/4″

$120

spoon-dec-7-overall

spoon-dec-7-side

——————–

Dec spoon 8 – SOLD.

Birch. My best spoon of 2016. It really made itself, the crook was so good. I had little to do…

L:  15 1/4″  W:  3″

$120

spoon-dec-8-overall

 

Jögge Sundqvist at TEDxUmea

One of the highlight’s of last year’s Greenwood Fest put on by Plymouth CRAFT was the presentation by Jogge Sundqvist called Rhythm & Slojd…
for a long time, a short version was available on the web. then it was gone. Now it’s back. but for the real thing, get on Plymouth CRAFT’s newsletter mailing list, so you find out about Greenwood Fest 2017 – http://www.plymouthcraft.org/contact

inspired by students

I did some carving today, in white pine, for window trim in the workshop. The pattern I cut was inspired by the students in the joined chest class at Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking. This design has been evolving for a while now, I wrote about the basic version of this pattern five years ago  https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/patterns-patterns/  This one has the additional step of hollowing the surface, and then doubling up the design.

double-braid

We carved single rows of this in the class, then first one, then another student asked about doubling them up. So I copied them in this case…Here’s some of what I did. The outline is based on margins and horizontal centerlines. I mark off the spacing with a compass, and strike a punch to give me a starting point for the pattern. Then I strike the arcs with a large, #7 gouge. For the doubled braid, the first rows of strikes look like a stack of curved Vs or seagulls…

first-cuts

Then I turn the gouge around, and strike going the other way, toward the outer margins.

flip-gouge

After the vertical strikes, I angle the tool downwards a bit, and remove a crescent chip.
chips

After this step, it now looks like a stack of handlebar mustaches.

 

stack-of-mustaches

Then I go at it some more with the large #7, and begin to connect the arcs…

large-gouge

A shallow #5 gouge snips out some areas between the arcs, making space for some shadows.

5-gouge

Then I used a #8 gouge to hollow the flat parts that remain…this cut is a pivoting quarter-arc…over & over.

hollow-w-gouge

hollow-pt-1-done

some go this way, some go that way…

hollowing

I shot some short video of carving some of this pattern. No edits, some fumbling around is included.

cutting braid from Peter Follansbee on Vimeo.

 

hollowing braid from Peter Follansbee on Vimeo.

a few more old drawings

here’s a few more of those old drawings from the other day. There isn’t much of a story behind them, but such as it is is in this link: https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/old-drawings-i-just-found-again/

oak paneling from the Guildhall in Exeter:

exeter-guildhall-paneling

“lower part of a Spanish desk, walnut”

spanish-desk

Upholstered chair, red velvet & embroidery

upholstered-chair

two chairs from the V&A:

va-chair

old drawings I just found again

I feel like I’m moving. I guess I am…I’ve been sifting through boxes of stuff that I stashed almost 3 years ago when I moved out of my old shop. The new one is nearing completion, so I keep sorting boxes…

 

english-paneling

People give me stuff every now & then, and somewhere along the line I got these small drawings. I forget who gave them to me. I scanned a few of them tonight. I don’t usually work from this sort of drawing, but I appreciate the skill that it takes to make them. They’re quite nice.

this first batch are all (except the cane chair) about 5″ x 7″ – but they’re not from one notebook, so the sizes vary. one seems like it says “drawn by C. M. Bill. I scanned them & darkened them a little…some are marked either “Albert & Vic” or “Al & Victoria” – thus the V&A in london…others are unmarked as to what collection they’re drawn from…

overmantel

table-base

v-a-childs-chair

the cane chair drawing is 6 3/4″ x 10 1/4″.

cane-chair

There’s about 10 more. I’ll scan those some point soon.