Spoon carving class in Massachusetts, Mar 14 & 15 Plymouth CRAFT

not much of a view

More snow, but it’s fine with me… I don’t have to be anywhere for quite some time. I get to stay right here, working, writing, playing with the kids and generally having fun. (except I should be paying bills instead of writing this post).  Today’s view was a bit blurry, due to sleet mixed in with the snow. That kept me from sitting by the window all day, and got me to try some work . I opened a small window to see the view, but others in the house get discouraged when I leave a window open on a day like this. 

snow

 

I did get some carving done, back in this spot for a short while…

indoor work area this week

But mostly I messed around with chores. I did take an hour or so to work with the kids, they learned some of the Fibonacci sequence, and we drew spirals until we ran out of paper. They especially liked the idea that this sequence could go on forever.

fibonacci 1

fibonacci 2

I’ve been preparing oak for the joined chest with drawers that I have to make, and it’s a warmup for teaching that class. But I am also carving spoons here and there.

spoons in basket

There’s some left for sale; and more underway. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/spoons-a-bowl-or-two-jan-2015/

If you want to come to a spoon class with me, I found out today that my spoon class at Lie-Nielsen in May is full. Ditto the 2 sessions at Roy’s. The only other spoon class I am scheduled to teach in the lower 48 is with Plymouth CRAFT at Overbrook House in Buzzards’ Bay, MA. Dates are March 14 & 15. This class is newly added…here’s the link to the blurb,  http://plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=carving-wooden-spoons-with-peter-follansbee

and another to the reports from our first go-round. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/spoon-carving-at-plymouth-craft-last-weekend/

If you are way up north, there’s a class in Alaska – here’s that link: http://www.alaskacreativewoodworkers.org/registration-for-the-peter-follansbee-classes-is-open/

for my full schedule thus far, here’s another link. Some box-making, bowl-carving & furniture carving. I doubt I’ll add much, if anything. Once I get travelling, I’ll be glad when I hit a gap & get to stay home again. https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2015-teaching-schedule/

 

 

 

 

 

 

ready, set, go

My wife is all right. Among the tons of junk she brought here all those years ago was 2 pairs of old, but not antique, snowshoes. So today after I finished planing oak for the afternoon, I went for a walk in the snow. Found this red-tail hawk. He landed on this branch while I was standing nearby.

Ready:

ready 1

 

Set: 

ready

Go:

 

go

Landed again, all of about twenty or thirty feet from where I first found him. And there he sat, til after the sun went down. 

done

He’s in the middle of this picture on the tall pole. As I was walking back to the car, I heard but did not see 2 great horned owls hooting. 

still there

winter time & the living is easy

For green woodworkers anyway. In summer, working in the wood pile can be unpleasant sometimes. Buggy, hot, humid. The wood storage can get to be a problem. Insects can get in your wood, decay can set into some species pretty quickly.

But in winter….it’s another story. This pile is against a steep embankment in my yard. 

wood storage

 

4 footers and up

 

Storing green wood in the log this time of year is a breeze. It’s like suspended animation, even better than Ted Williams’ head. (this is a sure thing, Ted’s head, I doubt it)  I try to store the stuff I need the most upright. There’s a few benefits. You don’t have to lift and heave big heavy log sections around to get at the one that’s just exactly perfect for what you need. And when it snows, it’s easier to uncover the stash. The short stuff in this pile is just over four feet, the birch might be over 6′. (I don’t know what that is in the other measuring system)

split & rived & ready to go in

Here’s some I split out today, broke it down further at the riving brake, and now will bring it in to plane  the long stuff for some joined chests & a cupboard. There’s other less-pressing stock under the snow. It can wait. 

The kids took a jaunt around the yard to test-drive their new snowshoes. More snow on the way, we’ll hit the woods tomorrow or the next day. 

REF snow shoes

DRF snow shoes

Spooked a great blue heron down by the river. 

GBH away

Snowed, so I had fun…

Very little woodworking tonight. Some pictures from this week thus far. 

When you have 2 young kids in New England, there should be snow in winter. Took a while this year, but we got it. 

snow sample

 

 

The river’s been full of slush and ice floes for 3 days. Maybe tomorrow we’ll see ducks. 

RIVER VIEW

 

This is where I have done a lot of my work since June of last year, there’s 3 long benches there, for working at & on…but you can’t see ‘em. Beside the stump is a large pile of hewing chips, and I think some bowls under there. 

OUTDOOR WORKSHOP

A stake-legged bench, shot it just for Chris. One of 5 or 6 in the yard. Range in height from 12″ to 20″ – lengths from 15″ to 5′. This is a small one the kids use for something. 

stake legged

 

I’m trying to learn sparrows this week. It was great, for 2 days, not an English sparrow in sight.

lbjHouse finch. 

house finch

 

a lead-up to a great leap of faith – that there’s no logs under there! 

about to leap

 

 

Earlier, I had shoveled the car out, even though I hope to go nowhere in the near future. All that work gave the kids a great place to play. 

heap o snow

top of heap

rose heap

 

Inside, I got to catch some more winter light. Our napkin holder. 

chip carving

 

 

I shuffled some stuff around earlier this week, and before it all went to wrack & ruin, I shot this chest of drawers I made back in 2003. 

cod 2003

 

My mother’s clock. Inside the covered pot is a slip of paper with a quote from my mother “Oh, dear, bread & beer; if I was dead, I wouldn’t be here.” But it’s not really true…

clock

 

Here’s where I have carved spoons since the snow fell… with a view of the river & feeders. 

 

indoor work area this week

 

The big fish eat the small fish. Late day visitor to the yard, one of the local red tail hawks. 

 

redtail in sun

 

The End

The end. (quite a way to start a blog post, huh?)

cf chest end view

On a piece of case furniture, some call it the side. I think of them as ends, as in “help me move this chest, grab the other end.”

I’m not one for measured drawings, but I am working some up for this chest project. Today I was laying out the end view of the chest we’ll build at the CT Valley School of Woodworking this season. http://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/woodworking-classes/29-speciality-weekend-classes/534-build-a-17th-century-joined-chest-with-peter-follansbee.html

In the class, we will delve deeply into the period chest we’re studying/copying, but will also look at numerous variations. These chests (Wethersfield/Windsor/Hartford area of CT) often have one large horizontal panel over 2 vertical panels. the upper panel is glued up in every one I’ve seen and made notes on… but the students will be making single-drawer versions. So that changes how we format the end view. I’ll offer them 2 versions & they can decide which to use.

CHS chest w drawers

 

There is no typical arrangement – but there are several that we see over & over. Like these:

a joined chest, one large horizontal panel on the ends. This panel is about 14″ wide (top to bottom) It requires a tree in the range of 36″ in diameter, straight as can be.

WA Dedham chest

 

 

 

One way around that issue is to divide the end with a muntin, and use two narrower vertical panels. Two more joints, but not a big deal. I do this most commonly. Note here the side top rail and the front top rail are different dimensions.
guilford chest

 

This next one is a chest with a single drawer. So two side-by-side panels above a single horizontal panel. In some cases, these panels all end up the same width – nice & neat for stock preparation.

 

braintree chest w drawerHere’s a chest of drawers, and I have found this arrangement on chests with 2 drawers too – two sets of vertical side-by-side panels. or 2 over 2 if you want to phrase it that way. You can cover a lot of ground this way.

PEM chest of drawers Essex Co
How these side views relate to the front view and more interestingly, to the rear view is a study in itself. Come take the class – we’ll be able to really explore joined chests in excruciating detail. You’ll be well-versed in joined chests by the end. The End.