birds not woodworking

I recently spent a great day with our friend Marie Pelletier up in Newbury, Massachusetts at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, aka Plum Island. She got great shots of many of the birds we saw… maybe this will take you to her shots – https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10213122359110858&set=pcb.10213122371511168&type=3&theater 

It was not the best light for me, my camera shoots kinda dark. But here’s some of what I got that day:
Egrets were the bird of the day; both snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Ardea alba)  – here’s one of the great egrets:

 

a bunch of the snowies:

great again

snowies again

They weren’t the only long-legged waders around though – we saw Great Blue Herons now and then (Ardea herodias)

A juvenile Northern Harrier – (Circus cyaneus )

The swallows were really the most impressive sight. Their numbers were out of this world. They’re “staging” – stopping here to feed and gather in huge flocks for migration. Many (most/all?) of these are tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) – there’s no way this photo or any photo captures the impact of seeing this many birds. they were in constant motion, and the sound of them hitting the water to feed on insects was LOUD. 

Here they are streaming through a gap in some trees, just an amazing sight. 

I never skip a chance to watch cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) this one was very cooperative

A couple of days later, at Pret & Paula’s house, an eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). Too distant for my camera, but such a treat to see it poking out of this dead tree:

Then this morning, the flock of common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula) with some other blackbirds mixed in, come streaming up from the marsh just around sunrise:

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Carved panel designs

final panel for bedstead

I just finished carving the 8th & final panel for the bedstead I have underway. There’s 4 patterns I used, each one repeats twice. most of them are patterns I made up, but drawn from a large body of work I have covered here a few times. The carvings that are the inspiration come from Devon, England and Ipswich, Massachusetts. I love these designs because they are so lively, and have so much variety.

Lately I’ve been trying to draw the designs – to try to learn how to talk about them – the parts, components and how they get combined. When I first saw these panels, I thought they must be the most involved carvings – but really they’re just busy…there’s very little background removed. Most of the impact is from the “horror vacuui” effect of covering every blessed surface with something. (This next one was a mistake – the board was 10″ wide, too narrow for the bedstead.)

Narrow panel

These patterns have a few common elements/motifs – most have an arch across the top of the panel. there are a few exceptions, but generally I carve the arch-top versions. All of these have an urn/vase/flowerpot just above the bottom/center of the panel. Then some leafy bits/leaves/flowers coming up and spreading out from this urn.   I tend to think of the designs being broken into thirds – though not necessarily even thirds.

Some wind up from the urn through the middle of the panel, then wind outward and reverse direction into the arch. Mostly these also bend downward, looping back toward the middle of the panel. In this case, there’s 3 tulip shapes inside this arc, then the big leafy bit that fills the bottom corner:

This pattern is easiest on wide stock, at least 10″ of carving space-width. This one, a chest I have copied a few times, the panel is 12 3/4″  wide x 15″ tall. Compare it to the narrow version above – I think it works better on the wide stock.

On this panel from the bedstead a single flower replaces the 3 tulips, same leaf at the bottom though:

Sometimes from the urn you get large shapes flowing almost horizontally out from the middle. these often have double-volute-ish scrolls where they hit the edges of the panel The one heading down then flows into a leaf shape that bends right against the bottom of the urn. This one is from the extra-wide muntin of the same chest –

Here’s the front of that chest – I copied the proportions and all the vertical bits from 2 examples I’ve seen in person, one other I know from a photograph. All were initialed & dated on the muntin; 1666, 1669 & 1682 for the dates. I substituted different (related) designs on the horizontal rails; and in this case added brackets underneath the bottom rail.

 

These carving often employ a three-part leaf, which is standard in the related S-scrolls – (seen here on a period box from Ipswich)

 

 

and on the panels this form is used again & again, inside spaces, between elements – it can be like this:

or like this part, just before it winds into the bottom of the arch:

 

Or along the side of the panel:

Hard to see it upside down, here it is from a period piece, the shape I’m thinking of is between the bottom of the arch and blends into the margin just above the large bottom leaves:

The bits flowing up from the urn that then turn down to the bottom corners can take several forms as well. The one I used at the top of this post is simple, big fat leafy shapes bending up then down. They split into three parts at the bottom – one to the corner, one to the feet/urn junction, and one between. Fill the spaces with gouge-cuts, and call it done.

as a drawing:

And carved:

I could go on forever, but this post has taken long enough. A few more panels of my work:

This one hangs in our kitchen, done in Alaska yellow cedar:

This oak panel was an experiment, I mostly like it, but rejected it for the bedstead:

This one took its place:

Here’s an example (a combination of 2 period carvings) of one of these panels without an arch:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bowls and spoons for sale, Aug 23 2017

 

Some items finished up lately. The first two in a series of bird bowls. I had some very large crooks recently, made some large spoons then dedicated some of these oversized crooks to bowls. And, a small run of straight-grained serving/cooking spoons.

I got some questions about the bowls, what does the blank look like? – here is a roughed-out bowl superimposed on top of its other half of the crook – had to cradle the crook in a notched block so it would stand for its photo. Gives some idea of where you can find these in a tree. They can be trouble to split. This one was 5″ in diameter, and 24″ tip to tip. Cherry.

 

and here is that roughed-out bowl grabbed between two wooden bench dogs – this is how I get at it to do the gouge work. If I keep getting crooks like this, I’m going to make a larger more robust set of these dogs. Note the notches in the inside faces.

If you would like to order a spoon or bowl, just leave a comment here about which one you’d like. Then I can send a paypal invoice,  or you can mail a check the old fashioned way. Either one is fine with me. Prices include shipping in the US – further afield and I’ll figure an additional shipping charge. Thanks as always for the support.

All these items are finished with food-grade flax oil.

—————————–

cherry bird bowl –

L: 15″  H: (at front) 7 1/4″
$500

 

Birch bowl – SOLD
L: 10 3/4″ H: (at front) 7 1/4″

SPOONS –

Aug spoon 1 – cherry, crook. This spoon blank left me with a very long, narrow bowl. Overall a long spoon. Great crook shape, I couldn’t resist.

L: 13 7/8″   W:  2 1/8″
$125 includes shipping in US

——-

Large cherry crook #3   – SOLD

L: 13″  W: 3 1/2″
$150 includes shipping in US

—————-

Large cherry crook #2

L: 13″  W:  4″
$150 includes shipping in US.

 

————-

Now, a series of straight-grained spoons for cooking or serving.

—————–

Aug spoon #1; birch   SOLD

L: 11″  W: 2 5/8″
$85

—————-

Aug spoon #2; birch  SOLD

L: 10 1/2″  W: 2 1/2″
$85

 

—————–

Aug spoon #3; birch

L: 10 1/2″  W: 2 5/8″
$85

—————

Aug spoon #4; birch  SOLD

L: 9 1/2″  W: 2 1/2″
$85

——————

Aug spoon #5; birch   – SOLD

L: 8 1/2″  W:  2 3/4″
$75

——–

Aug spoon #6; walnut   – SOLD

L:  10 1/2″ W: 2 3/4″
$85

After an interlude, it’s back to business as usual

Today, birds and birds. This first one in American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) – is going to get painted on the outside, then carved through the paint.

This tiny one, split out with the guidance of Dave Fisher, is birch – I forget which one. No paint, just carved today. Some spoons getting finished up in preparation for this weekend’s Lie-Nielsen workshop – full this time. More spoon carving classes to be announced through Plymouth CRAFT soon.

Then, some photos plucked off the card. Down river:


 

Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus ) I assume juvenile male turning to adult. The female doesn’t usually show the red, I believe.

yellow warbler. (Setophaga petechia) they are quieter now than in the spring, so I just happened to notice this one skulking around.

interlude

I pretend I exist in a bubble or cocoon. Each day I’m at home, I get up & have breakfast with the family, and then make my way out the back door to the workshop. Open up the windows to let in the sounds of the birds, check the river – tide in or out? Coming or going? And then sort the day’s projects – am I cutting these mortises, carving which pieces – most of my concerns are about really great quality oak, sharp tools, and learning from studies of period pieces…

And it goes like that day in & day out. Which hatchet? Are these bowls dry enough for the next step? Ah, I figured out what design to carve for that panel. Then, time to clean up the place and re-set the bench…

All the ordinary stuff is an intrusion – have to go to the dump, the bank, did I pay the bills? I just want to get back to work in the shop. All of that is just like the rest of us.

Every so often, I traipse out into the world to teach a workshop, deliver a lecture/demonstration – that sort of thing. And those audiences are pre-disposed to receive what I have to give. An interest in woodworking, furniture history, spoon carving – they’re already converts. But I know although we have woodworking interests in common, there can and will be things we don’t have in common. And that’s usually fine with me. I can get past a lot of stuff, and concentrate on our shared interests. And it has always been a great kick for me to come together with people I might otherwise not connect to…

This year, it’s been tricky, with the political climate in America and the world. I have specifically stated in many of my classes – “No politics, please.” Just to avoid the issue. Trying to be polite…and it has worked thus far. 

Like I said, I can get past a lot of stuff. But…not racism. Not Nazis marching in the streets of 21st-century America. That shit doesn’t fly. Everyone should be against that…none of this “many sides” crap.

So…in the hopefully unlikely event that some of my readers are sympathetic with the KKK, Neo-Nazis, White Supremacists, etc that were on display down in Charlottesville this past weekend, – if that’s you – please un-subscribe to my blog. Please stop following me on Instagram, FB…please don’t come to my classes. Please don’t buy my book, videos, spoons, etc.

I want nothing to do with racists.

Back to oak now.

Spoon inspiration, spoon carving resources

For the past week or more, I have been watching various posts about the goings-on in Edale, Derbyshire – the 6th annual Spoonfest. https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/spoonfest/ I was lucky enough to attend last year, and it was a real highlight being there. Spoonfest, put on by Robin Wood and Barn the Spoon and their cadre of interns, volunteers and friends – is the inspiration and model for Greenwood Fest that I help with at Plymouth CRAFT.

so I’ve been thinking a lot about (& carving some) spoons lately. When I teach classes in it, I like to bring along spoons I’ve collected from friends and other carvers for inspiration. I didn’t get too many this year at Greenwood Fest – couldn’t keep up with the shoppers. But a week or so ago, I was at my desk when the email came in about JoJo Wood’s shop update. I didn’t bother scrolling through all the spoons – they could be sold by the time I did that. I found one I liked & ordered it. Got it! The little dipper carved in the handle…

Here’s JoJo’s –

And one I got this spring from Jögge Sundqvist. 

Students always ask about where do you get this or that tool, and other references, resources etc for spoon carving. I have compiled a list, nowhere near comprehensive – of links and more that I can recommend. There are other sources out there, but I can’t keep up with them. I’ve given up trying. Formerly, I had posts about tool sources that included Country Workshops – Drew Langsner has now retired, and their tool-selling action is mostly going to be taken up through the Maine Coast Craft School…see below.

Videos –

The Spoon, the Bowl & the Knife, Wille Sundqvist film. DVD.

http://pinewoodforge.com/product/the-spoon-the-bowl-the-knife-dvd/

Carving Wooden Spoons with Peter Follansbee, Lie-Nielsen DVD.

https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/home-education-videos/carving-wooden-spoons-with-peter-follansbee?node=4243   

Jarrod Dahl, The Art of Spoon Carving, Popular Woodworking DVD

http://www.shopwoodworking.com/the-art-of-spoon-carving-dvd

Jögge Sundqvist, Carving Swedish Woodenware, Taunton Press DVD, 1988

https://www.amazon.com/Carving-Swedish-Woodenware-Jogge-Sundqvist/dp/1600853153

 

Books –

Wille Sundqvist, Swedish Carving Techniques, Taunton Press.

https://www.amazon.com/Swedish-Carving-Techniques-Fine-Woodworking/dp/1627106731/ref=pd_sbs_74_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=KX9XA3Y105QW3PF1F510

Barn Carder, aka Barn the Spoon, Spon – a Guide to Spoon Carving and the New Wood Culture.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Spon-Guide-Spoon-Carving-Culture-x/dp/0753545977

Coming 2017, Jögge Sundqvist, Slojd in Wood – Lost Art Press

https://blog.lostartpress.com/2016/12/28/sloyd-in-wood-by-jogge-sundqvist/

Tools

Del & Mary Stubbs, knives, etc. http://pinewoodforge.com/

Hans Karlsson & Svante Djarv tools: axes, knives, etc – through Maine Coast Craft School – http://www.mainecoastcraft.com/store.html

UK seller for HK tools – http://woodsmithexperience.co.uk/shop/category/hans-karlsson-tools/

Same for Svante Djarv – http://woodsmithexperience.co.uk/shop/category/svante-djarv/

Robin Wood’s spoon carving tools – http://wood-tools.co.uk/

Hans Karlsson website – http://www.klensmide.se/

Nic Westermann, blacksmith; knives, hatchets etc.  – http://nicwestermann.co.uk

Jason Lonon -toolmaker  http://www.jasonlonon.com/toolmaking.html

Reid Schwartz toolmaker http://www.reidschwartz.net/shop/

  

crest rail for headboard shaped & test fitted

I didn’t shoot the whole process of making the crest rail for the bedstead. But at the nearly-last minute I thought to get out the camera. The crest is a separate piece, sitting atop the integral top rail of the headboard.

I carved the design first. Then used a small bowsaw/turning saw to cut out the profile. I shot a couple photos during the clean-up of the sawn shape. The outline I cut with the V-tool as part of the carving. Then sawed pretty close to that.

I used whatever I could get in there with to smooth off the sawn bits and bring the profile to its final shape. A couple of spokeshaves, chisels and even a bent gouge.

Here it is test-fitted. The crest rail is 56″ long and 7″ high at the center.

 

And a detail:

I chopped two mortises in both the top rail and the crest rail, for floating tenons to help align and secure them. Part of the inspiration for it is the crest of a wainscot chair I have made a few times. I assembled the most recent version of this chair back in April, https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/wainscot-chair-assembly/  

I doubt (well, am damn-near dead certain) that the original chair(s) had no floating tenon between the top rail and crest. I have made and lost some crests by using the typical period construction (nails and sometimes a wooden pin between the parts) – so for the bedstead I have used what you see pictured in the chair photo here.