Greenwood Fest article & various photos

run away

For two full weeks, I was surrounded by some of my favorite woodworkers…now it’s pretty quiet, trying to get back into the day-to-day. If you want to re-live Greenwood Fest, here’s some links:

http://plymouth.wickedlocal.com/news/20160615/national-audience-in-plymouth-for-worlds-best-woodworking-artists

That article and more photos are compiled on Plymouth CRAFT’s facebook page.  https://www.facebook.com/CRAFTPlymouth/?fref=ts

a collection or two on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/greenwoodfest2016/  and

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/greenwoodfest/

I’m sure there’s more.

Plymouth CRAFT’s post-Greenwood Fest workshops

Plymouth CRAFT hosted 2 workshops after the Greenwood Fest 2016. Our model festivals do the workshops first, but we were making things up as we went along, or had scheduling conflicts, or something. So we did them after. One way this was an unexpected benefit is that often you don’t want an event like this to end. So it didn’t have to…

JoJo Wood taught her master class in eating spoons. These are the hardest spoons to make – they HAVE to be right. Cooking spoons & serving spoons can be strange & still work. Just look at my work for evidence of this.

It begins with accurate, well-thought-out hatchet work:

hewing

JoJo hewn spoon

Then, she was not bashful about telling all the old duffers where to cut their spoons to shape…

instruction

Working right beside Chris, saying “have faith, cut it like this…”

do what I'm doing

Meanwhile, Jogge Sundqvist taught his distaff class…a real challenging exercise in shapes, knife, hatchet & drawknife work, & design.

tin can openerThe tin-can opener grasp can be hard to grasp. Jogge helps illustrate proper technique.

here's how

Showing where some of these cuts are applicable in spoon carving.

how to get in tight spaces

These students made excellent examples…

great distaffs

Except this one – it doesn’t count. It’s Dave Fisher!

this one doesn't count

His class in bowl-carving is next – July 30/31 http://www.plymouthcraft.org/?tribe_events=bowl-carving-with-dave-fisher

dave bowl hewing

 

Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?

paula

If you have been to an event put on by Plymouth CRAFT, then you already know.

If you came to Greenwood Fest 2016, then you found out.

I said it there, & now I’m saying it again. If it were not for Paula Marcoux, none of it would happen.

We have many dedicated volunteers, board-members, guest instructors, etc – but altogether we can’t keep up with her.

The beginnings of Plymouth CRAFT stem from her vision. Once a bunch of us had moved on from our museum roots, she came up with the idea for forming this non-profit to teach various crafts. We all would have just kept saying, “yea, that’s a good idea, we should do it…” – but she went ahead and did it. So we just followed her lead.

I joke that when the idea for a Greenwood event came up, I said “bad idea, too much work.” But I also said I’d like to go to it, and she just listened to the 2nd part. I’m glad she did. We figured the notion was in the wind, following the great success of Robin Wood & Barn Carder with Spoonfest. So someone was going to do it in the US, and Paula decided it would be us.

Every email that got sent to Plymouth CRAFT about Greenwood Fest was answered by Paula. She personally handled everybody’s requests and comments.

Did all the registration stuff, and handled it when anyone needed to reschedule, refund – all that sort of thing. Sorted the waiting list, and delivered the news to those that squeaked in once spots opened up.

Then brought her bike to the event so she could get around the spread-out campus quickly enough to handle each emergency, request, or other logistical arrangements.

Paula also handled the after-classes planning & registration, then made lunch for 30 of us both of those days. And breakfast for nearly that many.

Those of us who have known her for decades are used to it, but I don’t want to take her work for granted.

So, here’s to the one who made it happen – Paula – thanks for Greenwood Fest 2016.

 

photo by Rick McKee

http://www.plymouthcraft.org/

Paula’s website including info about her book Cooking with Fire  http://themagnificentleaven.com//The_Magnificent_Leaven/About.html

 

 

3 days of peace, love & Sloyd

more photos.

apparently our group drank 6 times as much coffee as the ordinary dance group they host at Pinewoods Dance Camp. And almost no decaf.

jarrod's coffee

I didn’t catch whose tool basket it was…but there were sights like this all over.

tool basket

an overall shot of the area outside the dining hall, near the woodpile. I think there was always a crowd and action there.

gathering place

Like this.

stomping at the woodpile

Wade (right) tried to sneak into our group photo, posing as Derek Sanderson.

wade tried to sneak in

That’s how we noticed he was missing. Back row – Dave Fisher, Peter Follansbee, Paula Marcoux, front: JoJo Wood, Jarrod Stone Dahl, April Stone Dahl, Tim Manney, Beth Moen, Jogge Sundqvist, Pret Woodburn, Rick McKee.

group minus numb 16

Imagine Derek Sanderson, #16.

derek turning

Our friend Marie Pelletier, as always, shooting the event. Here, getting a group shot of the Wille Sundqvist & Bill Coperthwaite Slojd Fellowhips to Beth Moen & JoJo Wood. Peter Lamb on the left.

marie w awards people

she did it again. Beth was always well=behaved.

she did it again

A highlight for many of us was seeing these guys, who made JoJo look old. A.J., now an old-timer at spoon carving was along with his dad Alex again.

AJ

Gabriel from BC here adzing out a bird bowl.

gabriel w adze

Dave Fisher.

dave fisher

 

bowl & dave

JoJo Wood, of course.

jojo

hollowing

Me & Jogge Sundqvist sat for a couple hours, holding forth about spoons, design, tradition, people…etc.

PF & JSQ

 

PF & JSQ 2

I made exactly one spoon during the whole event.

PF one spoon

thanks to all, attendees, instructors, Plymouth CRAFT board & volunteers, Pinewoods Dance camp crew & staff – Nathan Goodwin for shooting wth my camera, so I had more pictures.

 

some shots from Greenwood Fest 2016 part the first

working an event like this, you don’t get to see it much. I saw some stuff last night on Instagram. here’s a few photos I shot in preparation and while walking over to where I was working on Friday afternoon – the opening of Greenwood Fest 2016.

JoJo warned me she likes to ruin pictures:

she warned me

Beth Moen (foreground) and JoJo Wood in back, finding some yellow birch to see how it works.

north american woods

Moving in – wow.

moving in

“I’m so happy” he said.  He always says that…

 

I'm so happy

Tim & I looked at an old ladderback chair, always fun.

found a chair to show Tim

Are you proposing to me?

are you proposing to me

Don’t you people have anything to do?

don't you people have anything to do

one of those Plymouth ponds…

long pond

Will there be any stars in my crown?

will there be any stars in my crown

Save one for me…

save me one

waiting to hew…

pret & rick's site

Waiting to carve…

waiting to carve

detail…

detail

I told him to stop all this free learning…Darrick couldn’t wait.

I told him no free learning

Somewhere in the mayhem, Paula found time for a laugh with Ben Brewster & JoJo Wood

found time for a laugh

Hey Jarrod – I shot it too – on your back.

I shot it too

shifting to the Greenwood Fest next

carved panel

My days have shifted some, from a focus on the workshop to now a focus on preparation for Greenwood Fest. Time to get some tools & projects together, and after the weekend, time to start moving wood, benches, tools & finally people into the site. The photo above is a carved panel, and one to-be-carved panel for my work at the Festival. I’m going to be working on a joined chest (just the front of it, I expect). Like this one:

white oak chest 2009

I have some great red oak for it, the other day I carved one panel, and the wide center muntin. I’ll carve the rails, stiles and one panel at the event.

carved chest prep

Work on the shop has slowed down now as part of this shift in priority. We got a lot of the sheathing up, leaving openings where the windows will go:

sheathing view 1

The front will have a window on each side of the door, and a pair of them just above. so we did almost no sheathing there yet…just enough to keep it connected to the sills.

sheathing view 2

This side has several windows along it, the one on our left is actually wider than this present opening, we’ll cut some of that sheathing away when the windows go in.

north side

Tucked under the north side of the building is some red oak I just rived for my upcoming class at Lie-Nielsen later this month. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/workshop/USA/129

sheathing view front

Here’s a better view of the front. When things settle down a bit, it will be up on the roof – to install red cedar shingles. Right now, the place reeks from these piles of cedar.

red cedar

I want to take a moment to thank all of you who donated towards my building project – with your help I was able to get all the sheathing & shingles to help keep this project moving along. It means a lot to me, the way folks have responded to this work. I can see the inside of the shop in my head, and I can’t wait to show it to you here on the blog.

The sheathing is locally sawn white pine, from Gurney’s, our favorite sawmill down in Freetown Massachusetts – http://www.gurneyssawmill.com/ – sixth generation of a family owned & operated sawmill.

wow that's a load

 

gurney's

 

The shingles were bought locally, but they are western red cedar – I got them from Taylor Forest Products – they treated me very well. Delivery charge was only $10!! How could that be?  http://www.taylorforest.com/application/home/index.aspx

wainscot chair

PF copy KP chair

I finished this wainscot chair and delivered it to the Martin House Farm in Swansea, Massachusetts yesterday. I should say I “completed” the chair, I applied no finish to it. They are looking into having it stained to look like the original. Speaking of  which…

side view chairs

I don’t often get to compare my results to the originals that I study. I sometimes don’t want to see the contrast. It can leave me feeling like I missed some obvious feature, muffed another one, etc. There’s a couple of things I’d do differently next time, but not too drastic.

chairs side by side

I added some height to mine, to bring the seat more level, or slightly canted to the rear. The original tilts forward now.

new & old

The original chair descended in the Cole family in Rehoboth and Swansea. Maybe dates from 165-1700. All oak. Some think it was made in Providence, some think it’s a Plymouth Colony joiner. Hard to say, there’s so little to go on. One very distinctive feature of this chair is the rear of the large panel. Instead of just beveling it to fit, the joiner made a tabled” or raised panel.  Here’s mine before assembly:

back of the back

Unusual in New England wainscots, but very common in Wiltshire, England. I have seen many wainscot chairs there done with a tabled panel in front, then the raised area carved. Here’s one from Salisbury, not a great photo but you can just make out the tabled/molded raised area, then carved.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Salisbury wainscot chair

A post about the raised panel, and the circular decoration on the carved side.

https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2016/03/31/the-wainscot-chair-panel-more/