next episode in Joined Chest series posted

ladderback chairs

In between some lackluster birding outings this month, I’ve been building some ladderback chairs and weaving hickory bark seats. And working on my “Making a Joined Carved Chest” video series. Last week I uploaded the most recent episode, “Joinery Test-Fit pt. 1. 

chest parts

This one’s about test-fitting the joinery for the front and ends of the chest. Some plow plane work, paring the tenons, keeping track of what goes where. It’s “Joinery Test-Fit, part 1” because the rear section of these chests is a subject all its own. So that’ll be part 2.

So far there are 8 or 9 videos in the series, most are around an hour long, some 1 1/2 hours. After the first introductory episode they are:

Splitting, Riving & Hewing

Planing Riven Green Oak

Planes & Green Oak: cleaning & sharpening

Finish Planing & Layout of Joinery

Carving the Top Rail

Cutting Joinery

Joinery Test-Fit.

There’s also one about Sharpening the Hewing Hatchet.

Still to come are two more on carving – the arched panels and the drawer front. One about sharpening the carving tools.

panel, joined chest, c. 1660-1680s

Cutting & fitting the till, same for the floor. Making & fitting the drawer. The lid, hinges & cleats. Making the pins and assembly. There’s probably more to it than that. 

Right now it’s just under 10 hours. I had estimated about 15 hours, but I was way off. Now I guess it’s more like 20. It’s a lot to plow through for both me & the viewer. But if you’re interested in how these chests are made, all of it will be covered in detail. 

Below is a 5-plus minute trailer of the newest episode. This can give you an idea of what the videos look and sound like. The videos themselves are at vimeo.com/ondemand/follansbeejoinedchest – there you can buy the whole series or individual videos.

3 thoughts on “next episode in Joined Chest series posted

  1. Peter, I was in your 1st m&t drawbore Woodright’s Class. The wood we used was from a Red Oak tree that had been down for a while. There were some very small bug holes that are in various 1 mm terraced “layers”. Do you know what they might be and what can be done to mitigate them. I’m embarrassed to say the chest is still unfinished. I plan to complete it soon and live in the very dry climate at 4000 feet and have everything fitted and loosely pinned. Peter Roth made a beautiful set of handles and hinges (sorry they are not “gunnels” but later style “pin” hinges), that I’ve fitted. What do you recommend to stop the little buggers from coming back to life and seal the wood. I’d prefer to see the wood grain.

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