Next video in the Joined Chest series posted

1/4s into 1/8s

I took some time out from the cupboard to sort & edit video clips for the next installment in the new series about making a joined chest. The video is a bit under 90 minutes and now at least there’s some action. It’s about splitting open the log and then riving out various parts with a froe. I also show how I use a hewing hatchet to further prep the riven stock prior to planing it to size. You’ll see some snippets about choosing a log, details on splitting a great log and a look too at working a below-average one as well. The video is available separately or as part of the whole series, which I expect to be about 12-15 hours overall. $85 for the whole series, $15 per video.

I’m looking forward to concentrating more on this project. I’ve added a new external microphone and a better #2 camera. Lots of juggling around to get at it, but most of the rest of the series will be in the shop, except some hewing here & there.

Next installment in 2 weeks will begin planing the stock. I’ll show how my bench works, some wooden planes and even some metal-bodied planes. Using them with green wood is like a science experiment! But you can do it…

I also added a video I shot last year about sharpening the hatchet, but that’s free on youtube already too. I plan on adding short extras here & there – first one will be about some of the history of these chests and how they compare to other 17th century New England chests. Sort of a slide lecture, but not boring I hope.

See www.vimeo.com/ondemand/follansbeejoinedchest/

2 thoughts on “Next video in the Joined Chest series posted

  1. If you’re worried about the science experiment and don’t have any wooden planes, build one! If you have access to a band saw you can knock together a laminated one in a couple hours and use the iron from your metal bodied plane. And don’t fuss over the wood either. I’ve built a jointer out of 3/4″ oak from the big box store with the sides rotated 90 degrees. Built a coffin smoother out of a block of African mahogany. And several grooving planes out of birds eye pine. They all work great and will hold up fine for hobbyist use. The jointer and smoother use standard bench irons and chip breakers and the grooving planes use chisels for irons.

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