in between

I got the cupboard all framed finally. Here’s the lower case, resting on its back. Now it makes much more sense, you can see the openings for the recessed drawers between the upper and lower drawers.

lower case

I tried to get a shot showing the whole thing – but the shop’s too small for that. I’ll have to go outside & shoot through the window next time.

crammed in there

Next up, I have to find some new logs; oak, maple – plus some pine boards. Meanwhile, I’m making a list of things to check when I go see the original again. It’s been 20 years since I’ve seen it. So I shifted gears just a bit while that project is in waiting. A joined stool framed, and parts for the next one freshly planed.

joined stool framed & in-the-works

I still have some of that hickory I’m working through. I got out Drew Langsner’s Country Woodcraft: Then & Now and made a few pitchforks – not because I need them, but just to practice some bits of green woodworking that I don’t get to much these days, including bending. After shaving the blank to shape, I ripped the tines down.

sawing tines

Drew’s instructions show how to make a rivet from a 10d nail & some washers. Then it’s into the steambox. Once it comes out, time to spread the tines, then bend the whole thing.

hammering wedges in to spread the tines

The most encouraging part of Drew’s description was something along the lines of “after some clumsy first attempts…” A lot happens in rapid succession – driving in the dowels between the tines, spreading the tines, then bending the fork. It’s been 30 years since my last pitchfork projects…and it shows.

exhale

I made about four of them. Here’s the first two. One is four tines, one is three – but the real difference is that they were each bent on a different form – resulting in a different shape. Drew’s form is the 4-tine one in front.

two different shapes

Last view – the tines.

Then comes the next barrage of brettstuhl doings. Friends in Germany did my bidding, literally, and got me a slightly-used Ulmia grathobel – a dovetail plane. Time to practice with this and get onto my next brettstuhl.

Ulmia grathobel

That’s enough for now. We’re working on the next video, showing the test-assembly of the cupboard. And on & on.

9 thoughts on “in between

  1. Does the german plane make the negatives, and then you finesse the positives on the sliding batten?

    • Nope, just the opposite. It cuts the “male” part of the sliding dovetail. The photo is poorly lit, but you can see the test oak batten beside the plane. One of its edges is in shadow, but the other shows the dovetail cut in it.

  2. muita sabedoria, muito obrigado por ter oportunidade de apreciar. Lembro e tenho orgulho, pois na minha infância, eu cheguei ajudar o meu pai nas artes ( ajudar no sentido tá presente com uma água etc.,).

  3. Wow Peter the cupboard looks great. besides being big I could imagine it being heavy. What type of wood did you use for the pitch forks? I caught a glimpse of some neat brettstuhls on a old movie that was on over the weekend called “Thank your lucky stars” any who towards the end of the movie they had a early British pub scene on stage with a bunch of different brettstuhls & handmade furniture. One had the carved face of a happy cherub or baby face on the entire back part with its mouth cut out. Kinda humpty dumptyish but neat and different I don’t have fancy tv to rewind so only saw for sec but stood out. Keep up great work,

  4. Thanks so much for sharing all of the work you do. What an inspiration you are. Thanks lots.

    On Sun, Jul 18, 2021, 7:55 AM Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notes wrote:

    > pfollansbee posted: ” I got the cupboard all framed finally. Here’s the > lower case, resting on its back. Now it makes much more sense, you can see > the openings for the recessed drawers between the upper and lower drawers. > lower case I tried to get a shot showing the wh” >

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