Summer/fall reading; new pile of books

books-2

It’s been a summer of inspiration for me in many ways. One way is books. So much book inspiration that I’m building a new bookcase. Just have to see where I can fit it. Here’s a few titles I’m rummaging around in these days.

First up, a gift. Thanks, Jögge.

jogge

jogge-spread

It’s  Jögge Sundqvist’s book Slöjda I Trä  (something like “Handicrafts made in wood”) – the publisher is Natur & Kultur, Stockholm. It’s a revised edition of an earlier book of the same title. More projects, more text. Nice clear drawings and diagrams, great photos and COLOR! As you expect from Jögge… it’s in Swedish. http://www.bokus.com/bok/9789127148833/slojda-i-tra/

Another revised edition that just arrived here this week is Victor Chinnery’s Oak Furniture: The British Tradition.

chinnery
bigger & better

chinnery-boxes

One of the great thrills of my joinery career was getting to know Vic. His book originally came out in 1979, and stayed in print for eons. But since Vic’s death, his wife Jan has been working on revising it for a new edition, and they’ve taken a great book and made it better. When Jan wrote to me asking for help contacting American museums for photos, I thought it was mostly to just add more color. But the new edition is way more than that, there’s better photos all around, lots of color added, it’s true. But many new figures. The old photo numbering system is still there. Each photo is numbered according to the chapter it’s in, thus fig. 3:210. When Jan and the editors have added new items, they get a small letter after the figure number, thus there is a fig. 3:210a, where there wasn’t before.

Most of the pictures are bigger, thank-you very much. The book is bigger, which helps. In an age where it seems like everyone but me is running around looking at things on small screens, it’s nice to have some images get bigger rather than smaller. If you are serious about oak furniture, then you’ll want to get this new edition. I’m glad I did…it’s well worth it. (and yes, the cover of Oak Furniture is still a walnut chair. Nice one, Vic). http://www.antiquecollectorsclub.com/uk/store/productdatasheet/9781851497157

I had mentioned some time ago about Lost Art Press’ new edition of Ants Viires’ Woodworking in Estonia. (I just now realized that’s 3 revised books in a row…weird) 

estonia

estonia-spread

I wrote a short intro to it, just some notes about my exposure to the original English edition. Now we get better, clearer illustrations, and a text that is related to what the author wrote. And you can buy it easily, whereas the 1969 edition was like hen’s teeth. Suzanne Ellison wrote a nice history of the book, and how it got to be translated and published by the US government back in the 1960s. If you’re not familiar with the book, the author travelled his native countryside in the 1950s and 60s, recording in photographs, drawings and notes the woodworking practices in the countryside, which he reckoned were soon to disappear. Much of the work presented relates to agricultural work; but lots of it is things for the home – cooperage, boxes, some spoons, some furniture. What always strikes me is the familiarity with the material these craftsmen had. A must-have for green woodworkers… https://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/woodworking-in-estonia

In some ways, this next book is similar, in that it’s about knowing the properties of trees.

wiggle-tree-book

wiggle-tree-spread-2

This one, however, is new, and written by woodworkers, it is the Swedish book Slöjden börjar i skogen – The title roughly translates to “Craft begins in the Woods.” How to use what sort of tree where, what sort of growth – straight, crooked, hard wood vs soft. I bought mine at Sätergläntan’s great craft store, an amazingly inspiring place. I have just started to work out some of the text via Google translate. It’s enough to get the gist of it. (here’s the link to Sätergläntan’s store; it’s available elsewhere, but I know nothing about who ships where… http://www.saterglantan.com/butik/butiken/litteratur-sv/slojden-borjar-i-skogen/ )

At the same time, I bought a book about turned vessels in Sweden Vackert svarvat-skönt målat. Folkkonst ur skålaknallens fässing under tre sekler.

bowls-book

bowl

I had seen this one on Jarrod Stone Dahl’s blog, after one of his earlier trips to Sweden. I haven’t turned a bowl in 2 years, but hope to get to it again before too long. This book was one of those things where I thought, I’m not going to see this again, so better get it now. Might need it later.

Continuing the Swedish theme, when I got home, I was searching used books for one on Swedish vernacular furniture. I didn’t find one yet, but I did find Swedish Folk Art: All Tradition is Change.

swedish-folk-art

folk-art-spread

(edited by Barbara Klein and Mats Widbom, published by Harry Abrams, 1994) It’s an exhibition catalog of sorts. Lots of great painted interiors for one thing, and there is a good deal of furniture and other decorative arts in it. It’s a very nice book. Makes me want to decorate everything in sight.

I also got the Lost Art Press edition of Charles Hayward’s articles titled The Woodworker: the Charles Hayward Years. I got both volumes, seems silly to scrimp on this sort of reference material. Lots of depth to the ideas, there’s both fundamental and advanced information in there. With this much content, every woodworker is going to come across stuff they don’t agree with, but there’s still many good concepts. (For instance, I hate the way 20th-century woodworkers scribble all over their stock with pencils – all those stupid wiggly lines. Ugh.) All in all well worth having, it gets the usual Lost Art Press treatment, nice production.  

hayward-spread

https://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/the-woodworker-the-charles-hayward-years

One last woodworking book, a gift from our friend Masashi Kutsuwa.

van-gogh-chair

It’s about a chair he’s been studying in Japan, based on a Vincent Van Gogh painting; https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/vincent-van-gogh-van-goghs-chair hence the nickname “Van Gogh chair”. Masashi’s facebook page has some details about the project, starting with Tatsuaki Kuroda’s 1967 trip to Spain to see these chairs being made…this link includes a short film of one of the Spanish chairmakers.

https://www.facebook.com/masashi.kutsuwa/posts/1180509185326625

The book traces the introduction of this chair, via imports, into Japan; all the way to Masashi and students making them now in Japan.

And while I was in Sweden, I got 2 books on birds there – I used this one a lot; and I didn’t see the woodpeckers shown below, but I was ready for them…it’s a very good bird book. One thing, the maps are large enough to see…

bird-book

wps

 

The next one was pure indulgence. I have a couple other Lars Jonsson books; they’re bird books and art books. I like both.

lars-jonsson

robin

7 thoughts on “Summer/fall reading; new pile of books

  1. Even in the non-actual wood work I find your blog work inspiring. Keep up the good work Peter, you’re building a tiny kingdom of knowledge for people to live in.

    Best regards,

    Jason Judd On Tue, Sep 13, 2016 at 19:20 Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notes wrote:

    > pfollansbee posted: ” It’s been a summer of inspiration for me in many > ways. One way is books. So much book inspiration that I’m building a new > bookcase. Just have to see where I can fit it. Here’s a few titles I’m > rummaging around in these days. First up, a gift. Than” >

  2. Speaking of books, whatever happen to your book we were expecting
    to be out by now?

    Leo Meilak
    Field Engineer
    CARESTREAM HEALTH INC.
    Cell Phone 516 983 9951

  3. I’d love to get ahold of Jögge Sundqvist’s book Slöjda I Trä, but the bookstore you linked (after much consultation with Google Translate) only ships to the EU. Do you know of source that would ship to the US?

  4. Thank you. Would love to visit Scandinavia some day, you’ve made that a much more important goal.

    Lars Jonsson is a master; none finer today. Sort of a modern day Louis Agassiz Fuertes.

  5. In the back of Masashi’s book is a picture of President Jimmy Carter shaking hands with maybe Tatsuak Kuroda the Honored Japanese woodworker who filmed the ‘Spanish Chairmaker’ in 1967.. Jimmy sold four Ladderbacks at Sotheby’s in 1983 for $21000 each and gave the moneys to charity… I think he’s still building with Habitat for Humanities

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