fitting the cupboard door

As promised – fitting a wooden hinge on a cupboard door. Again, I think I’ve never covered this on the blog. Here’s the cupboard, sans door: note the rabbet in the muntin beside the door opening.

assembly begun

To hinge this door with wooden pins is easy. Bore holes in the upper and lower rails’ inside edges. Here’s the top rail – I haven’t finished pinning the joints in the frame, but ignore that. See the hole bored in the upper rail’s lower edge:

top rail hole for pin

Corresponding hole in the upper edge of the door, note bevels on outer corners of door stile:

top of door

 

 

The wooden pin on the top of the door bottoms out in the stile, and protrudes up into the upper rail. Here it is in the stile:

top pin

 

here’s the bottom edge of the door – note the pin here fits (loosely) all the way up into the stile:

 

bottom of door

 

With my finger covering the hole in the bottom of the door, I tilt the upper pin in place, and then lean the door into its opening.

 

tilt in the top

 

Then knock it about some with a hammer, to jar the pin loose so it drops down into the bottom rail.

knock the bottom edge

The hole in the bottom rail is shallow, so the pin bottoms out in the rail and sticks up into the door’s hole –

open

 

I planed a rabbet in the door’s other stile, to overlap the rabbet in the frame. This stops the door from going all the way into the cupboard. You can (& I have sometimes) make rabbets on the hinge stile too – so the door is a little more snug = this one just butts up against the muntin.

door knob, couple of pins, linseed oil & this one’s crossed off.

Saw this guy this AM on my walk –

strut

 

 

 

 

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12 thoughts on “fitting the cupboard door

  1. I’ve used a very similar method for replacing a missing till lid in a chest. Instead of the ‘knocking about’, I slid a scratch awl through an inconspicuous side entry hole to little by little inch the dowel into the lid hinge hole. Worked like a charm. Cool technique, Peter!

  2. Looks nice Peter. So what did you end up doing with the back? If I remember, you had to change plans due to some off-sized boards. Just curious.

    Cheers,
    Derek

    • Derek – just did it today. Instead of a backboard like a 6-board chest, w rabbets & nailed in place, I made a panel that fits on, and is nailed to, the rear flush edges of the chest sides, top and mid-shelf. It sits on the overhanging (out back) bottom shelf. I’ve seen lots of rear panels in joined work done this way, but not on board construction. I’ll try to post a photo later. I shot a couple.

  3. yep, you said it would be simple, and it is, but its always interesting to see the way you have found it to be done in that period.
    Still, requires some skill to get everything to jive once the bottom pin drops into place, and you close the door against the rabbeted stile.
    very nice! Thanks
    RW

    • well, Daniel, I plumb forgot about the ol’ MFA cupboard! thanks for digging it up. The repeats work for many, because there’s lots of new readers. The rest of us have just forgotten, so it seems new. Thanks again< PF

  4. HI PETER,
    MAKE A TWIST FREE FRAME IS A BIT DIFFICULT. HOW YOU ENSURE THIS, IN ORDER TO MAKE A DOOR OR FRAME THAT FITS WELL WITH NO PROBLEM?
    THANKS,
    VALERIO.

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