I save the finishing touches for last

hewn bowl 14-04 catalpa

Today I was thinking a lot about hewing a bowl with an adze. I was swinging a tool up and down, chopping into a large hollow shape, getting out the innards, and pulling out the chips. Getting more & more open = chop, sweep, chop, sweep. But instead of the confines of my home shop, I was on the ladder, chopping ice out of the old house’s gutters. Now the melting snow flows, but soon it will ice up again. Anyway, it was a nice afternoon up there in the heavens- but  the only woodwork was in my head.

paint

I did get a first coat of paint on the oak box I made. I checked the schedule, and decided I’d try to get it painted before I ship it off to Alaska. It looked too bland as it was. After this part dries, I’ll put some black squiggles & dots, then a coat of thin red over the oak. the paints are linseed oil/turpentine with iron oxide (red) and yellow ochre; and bone black. I mixed some raw umber in to help the drying too. The lid looks like it’s painted white in the photo above, but that’s just all the light from the snow. It’s a white pine lid, so very pale.

The layout for the oval on the lid, and a view of the till inside – recycled chip carving practice.

oval

till

The cedar box just got linseed oil and turpentine. Helps highlight the carvings. Two comments yesterday from stitch-women (up-graded from stitch-girls; i.e. textile arisans – thanks Denise & Mary) praised the odd-proportioned box, one suggesting a sewing box. So now I know how to market it.

cedar box side view

cedar lid

 

Here’s one many of you have seen before, related to the oak one I’m doing now.

carved oak box

 

 

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3 thoughts on “I save the finishing touches for last

  1. Not a comment, exactly, but a question; you have obviously done loads of research on original 17th century boxes. I am wondering on your choice of paint. Is this your own preference, or is this the medium they would have been using then. I would have expected the paint to be casein but the only thing I have to go on is the 18th and 19th century German painted pieces I am familiar with, and Cennini Cenino’s (and Theophilus as well) treaties on painting furniture. Anyway, love your work!

  2. I can’t wait for your course this Summer Peter. I may just have to have a go at it in The Woods. If I can get some time off from felling, making deer, Shaker pegs, towel rails, repairing benches, hedge-laying, etc, etc – man I feel tired just thinking about it all.

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