I have more fun than I can stand

I keep plugging away. Yesterday I got to use some planes!

planes gauges

 

What a blast – the spoons and bowls are great fun, challenging, etc…but no planes. I need to make a molding to run around my most recent frame & panel – it’s one like this, all I have left is to make the molding & cut & glue it in. 

frame & panel
frame & panel

I keep a stash of riven Atlantic White Cedar, just for this purpose. First, I planed the stock to the proper thickness, in this case 1/2″

planing w jointer

Then I dig out one of those special wheelie gauges to mark out the rabbets, a la Matt Bickford. You already know I’m a fan; his book & video show you how to tackle this work easily. http://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/mouldings-in-practice  & http://www.lie-nielsen.com/dvds/moldings-in-practice/

The gauge I got from the Alexander collection – thanks once again JA. 

wheelie gaiugethen rabbets. 

rabbet plane

and bevels, then hollows and rounds. 

round

 

Then it was time to pack it away & off to the Cape Cod League Baseball – we went to Wareham to see the Gatemen take on the Falmouth Commodores. We were there early, so Daniel watched batting practice – I carved spoons. Then we watched the game. Gatemen blew the lead in the ninth – took it on the chin. 

gatemen 1

gatemen 2

 

One of many great things about working at home is that I get to see stuff I only used to hear about. Here’s a marble game from yesterday:

marble game

That then turned into a painting by Daniel, who was learning about shadows and light sources this week.

daniesl watercolor marbles
Daniel’s watercolor of marbles in dirt

This one’s just thrown in there – it’s part of an ongoing series of raking light shots.

ongoing raking lght series

 

 

8 thoughts on “I have more fun than I can stand

  1. Peter,

    During the last three years, one month and 12 days I’ve been able to be a better husband and father. Though I travel more, I’m in the house more.

    Add to that that I don’t have job from which to bring troubles home. All good.

    Losing the safety net is a bit unnerving, but you get used to it.

    Hell, you can always eat acorns.

    • You really can eat acorns. My dad grew up poor and told me he used to eat them sometimes. I tried them recently – I’d rather have a job and eat peanuts :)

  2. Some of us are not particularly in the know about you Peter. My knowledge of you comes from seeing you on the Woodwright Shop. You are a natural in front of the camera, by the way. I was looking forward to meeting you at Plimouth on June 27th. I was a few days too late on that one! What I’m getting at is that I, and many of your readers are new to Peter Follansbee and your world. I for one, want to keep following you to see how you do as an entrepreneur but I need you to consider fleshing out your posts a bit for those of us not up speed on your world. For example, what is the Alexander Collection? Who is Daniel? Your son? Grandson? Is the panel you show here a personal piece or a commission piece? Is your business plan to create pieces as an artist on speculation or to follow a more work for hire model?

    • Fair enough, Lou. I’ll answer your questions, then later this week I’ll write a general post to welcome the new readers. The “Alexander collection” refers in a casual way to my long-time colleague Jennie Alexander – (formerly John Alexander, author of Make a Chair from a Tree) – JA, as I refer to her most often, has been quite generous to me over the years with tools and books. A couple years ago, we sold off many of JA’s excess tools (the older you get the fewer you need!) – but my deal was I got to cherry-pick before selling. Hence, I got the gauge from the “Alexander collection.” Daniel is my 8 1/2 yr old son, twin brother to Rose. They appear here from time to time, or their artwork. or both. The panel I was working on the other day will be for sale in 3 weeks – from time to time I make carved frame & panels as wall hangings, (or whatever the buyer wants to do with them.) = they came about in response to requests from people who wanted carved work but weren’t interested in a finished piece of furniture. I have no business plan. I make bowls, spoons, carved oak furniture, teach classes at various locations; and write books & shoot DVDs. I’m hoping I can make that work out. that’s the plan.
      thanks for your comment, I will follow with a whole intro. There’s 6 1/2 years’ worth of posts here – almost 700 posts altogether. whew.

  3. peter,
    Felt the want to chime in, after reading Chris Schwarz’s comment. I’d like to add that for a quick three years, a few months, and couple of days, you directly influenced and inspired me. I will always feel as though I didn’t take advantage of what was right in front of me. My loss.
    You will just continue doing truely great work, for a living, so you can provide. You’re one of the people who have taught me that the concept can actually be achieved. You’ve been doing it for years now.
    It will all be different,.. But just the same.
    See you soon around Burrey’s yard.
    – Justin

  4. I laugh, having followed the blog for a few years, I could have answered all of those questions. I’ve driven from Michigan twice to stalk him. It’s been a pleasure to follow the blog, see the work, the tools, kids growing and a some excellent bird photography. Plan your next vacation around one of his classes, you won’t regret it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s