spoon & furniture photos

I shot some more stuff today…

I have been carving up the last of 2013’s spoons – some serving spoons in cherry heartwood. When cherry logs lay around too long, the sapwood goes off, but the heartwood is still good in this log after 8 months –

I shot these two spoon bowls together to show the variation in the grain pattern inside the bowl. The centerline on the spoon on the right is mostly centered on the piece of wood – so you get a nice, even concentric pattern as you cut into the succeeding layers to hollow out the bowl.

The one on the left was a bit whacky, I forget why now. Some defect caused me to line up the centerline of the spoon to one side of the centerline of the split billet. So now the grain pattern inside the bowl is one-sided. I like this effect; but I like the other one too. All this becomes horridly small details that matter to few…but it helps to know how & why different patterns emerge.

cherry spoons underway
cherry spoons underway

All the spoon blanks have to be split in such a way that the central section of the tree, the pith, is avoided. Usually it is hewn away. Leave it in, and the spoon will crack, probably more than 99% of the time.

But do you then hollow the side towards the bark, or towards the pith? Well, you can do either – one will get this pattern, one that. Here is a 3rd spoon dropped into the photo above, showing the pattern resulting from hollowing the face towards the pith. Usually I hollow the wood near the bark side, like the middle spoon.

3rd spoon
3rd spoon

When you hollow them in green wood (almost always the case) – the bark side bowl gets narrower, but deeper upon drying. The other gets wider, but shallower. This is the effect of differential shrinkage in the wood. More minutiae, though. The amount they shrink & distort is not great, to my way of thinking. I’m more concerned about the grain pattern, or quirks of the individual spoon blank. I generally work them all bark-side up, but if the tree has another idea…I’ll follow the tree’s lead.

 

Here’s some furniture that made it to the background paper today. First is the chest I made for the museum. Every year they have a raffle for one of these. This is the one I made piece-meal – started in April, finished in Oct/Nov. Never again. Finishing it up in the last few weeks was an ordeal.

raffle chest 2013
joined carving chest, 2013 – oak & pine

Here’s the little 2-panel chest I made for the Woodwright’s Shop episode. It still needs its hinges installed, but that’s manageable. A combination of red oak, with 2 white oak sawn panels in front. Pine floor boards.

two-sie chest
small joined chest, red & white oak, white pine

Here’s a detail of the next version of that little chest…I just couldn’t leave all that blank oak around. This one’s for me…riven matched panels in front.

next two-sie chest
gouge-carved chest in progress

The gouge-cut carvings. one tool, two moves.

next two-sie detail
detail carving

a joinefd form, red & white oak. A little more than 5 feet long, I think. I forget. The seat is quartersawn white oak.

joined form
joined form, red & white oak

10 thoughts on “spoon & furniture photos

  1. Peter love your hand craftsmanship Is your only spoon class in main in 2014

    Bill Ribble CR Advertising 888-889-0479 (toll free) 319-290-6639 (cell) Sent from my iPhone

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  2. Peter, I absolutely love the “joined carving chest, 2013 – oak & pine” Man the colors in the background make a huge difference. I would say it could double the value.

    I so wish I could find a new pair of steady hand in order to do this type of work. The joinery is not the issue, but the Carving is something my hands and eyes are not equipped yet to do. I’m entering my 57th year, perhaps… perhaps.

  3. Beautiful work Peter. I have to build one of those joined forms one of these days. At what length would you start thinking about adding a 3rd set of legs in the middle?

    Happy Holidays to you and your family.

    Bill

  4. Mr. Follansbee:

    Aside from your appearances on The Woodwright’s Shop, is your spoon-carving available on video? Perhaps as something with more depth than that necessarily limited venue? A trip to Maine (or to Country Workshops) is not in the stars this year, but I am interested in learning much more than I’ve seen. I am of the opinion that face-to face is the best way to learn a craft, but I’ll take what I can find in the meantime.

    In searching your archive, I also saw an entry about hewn bowl carving. Do you anticipate teaching that subject in the future, or will you concentrate on spoons?

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