Next installment on the joint stool class

I’ve forgotten now just exactly how it all went; but making the rail stock, then cutting tenons was among the first order of business once we had the riven pieces in the shool/bench room. Here’s an example of just how dead flat this wood was; these tenons in the first photo have not yet been pared – they were this flat and even from splitting the cheeks. When the oak works like that, the joinery is a snap.

great rough tenons

Here’s Jerome sawing shoulders, prior to splitting the cheeks. the students learned about working with stock having an irregular cross-section. Sometimes it does not lie flat on the wooden bench hook for sawing. This can make things confusing when you are trying to saw to the line – sometimes you’re not sawing parallel to the bench top, because of the tapered cross-section that stems from riving.

tenons

Then splitting with a chisel. Here’s Tony giving it a smack.

tenon splitting

Bill caught looking at the camera – he’s supposed to know better.

caught bill looking

A few rails with scratch stock moldings cut on their lower corners.

scratch moldings

Then came making the stiles, and mortising. Well, layout before that. The old “two-consecutive thoughts” situation…

The guys really bore down & chopped & chopped. 16 mortises is a lot if you’re not used to working this way. Here’s John & Kelly having at it.

more mortising

mortising

Then while packing to go to Lie-Nielsen, Roy took some time out to show us the passer drill that he & Peter Ross collaborated on. It’;s based on a British version, used to cut out the cavities for inlaid brass or other metals in the stocks of squares and similar tools.

passer drill detail

passer drill

template

ready for brass inlay

old & new

Here’s a link to the whole story pretty much. I think he did it on the show one time, or in Popular Woodworking. I found this one on the web…

3 thoughts on “Next installment on the joint stool class

  1. You got that right right!
    Sawing tenon shoulders to depth is a challenge.
    The tenon on the left rail in your photograph appears to be over sawn.
    I have figured out a a simple and easiy way.
    But I mostly keep turning the stock around and peeking at the far edge.
    Would you feel comfortable handing out cheap plastic mirrows?
    I’ve got some!
    Jennie

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