stopped by work today…lots to do when I get back tomorrow. We went to pick up some spoon wood, but this was too big for me today. It’s a catalpa, said to have ants in it, I’ll cut some tomorrow & see. 

 

catalpa
catalpa

then, we saw two or three eagles – I got terrible photos, but these were my first real views of the winter for these birds.  These are lousy views, but we got pretty close to a juvy later back near the shop…he got close to us I should say…

adult

juvy

 

Then we found a few cherry trees down, this was the biggest. Bowls and spoons I say. 

cherry
cherry

 

The kids were more interested in the sheep, who seemed to be interested in nothing at all. 

 

doin nothing

kids n sheep

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10 thoughts on “

  1. Carving catalpa will spoil you – like planing white cedar. I have a spoon and a spatula that I carved from catalpa a couple years ago. I use them daily and they still look great. That tree was filled with ants as well, but they left plenty for me.

  2. Looks like you will get some nice wood out of those two trees. That cherry looks like you could even get a nice saw bolt.

    By the way, did you like the video I sent you about the Zafimaniry wood carvers?

    Regards,

    jay

  3. After living in the land of 40 million sheep (10:1 ratio of sheep to people) in NZ, I would have to say you summed up my experience of sheep quite well.

  4. I’d be interested in buying something made from catalpa wood, if you get so far as making and selling. My dad and grandpa always had catalpas in their yards, as kids we’d get paid a dollar to pick up the pods in the fall. I’m nostalgic for the trees, both those houses/yards have sold out of the family.

  5. Jennie says:
    Catalpa is a fascinating light wood. It is a native American tree. Three or four leaves exit the twig at one location (forget which). Said that Indians made woden canoes from it.Kids like me thried to smoke the beans as cigars, YUK!
    I suspect it has good resistance to moisture.Possible problem as kitchenware. It has a quite strong resinous taste. But I have never put any in service. Baltimore’s large Druid Hill Park used to have many catalpai There is one in the yard next door to me. I suspect at one point they were an ornamental in Baltimore. Can someone comment on all this cause it is a strange collection of “facts.”I have seen older large catalpa that are are essentially hollow at ground level supported by a shell of wood possiblly 2-3 inche in thicknss!There is some process that seems to rot out or consume the heart wood.As a kid in the thirtues I saw homeless overnight in the hollow.

    • Hi Jennie,

      I’m sure there is much on the net about the tree, the bits that may not be commonly know is the name is incorrect. The botanist that named it messed it up. It’s real name is “Catawaba” which is it’s native name after the Catawaba People of the East Coast. Medicinal use, laxative, mild sedative, wormer, not to be used by the unskilled herbalist. Tree was planted commercially by both the rail road companies and fisherman. One for bait, of course, and the other for the rot resistance of the inner trunk, which I always found strange since many are hollow. My Grammy made spoon, ladles and Mom made masks of the wood. It is a beautiful wood, carves wonderfully, and I have helped make a few Dulcimers with it. Several elder Luthier I met like it’s tonal quality.

      Regards,

      Jay

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