carved panel

the June 2009 issue of Popular Woodworking includes an article I did about the carved work in my joined furniture. I was quite pleased with the treatment I received there, and the printed result.

 I carved two panels in photographing the stuff for the article, thus decided I was well on the way to another chest. So it is now one of the too-many projects I have going.  It’s been a while since I made something for the house, so we’ll see if there’s room for it here. 

Here is a detail of the central panel and some of the framing; it’s further along than this now, but I haven’t had much chance at photos. The muntins are made from quartersawn white oak, the rails are riven white oak and the panel riven red oak. I am planning on painting the carvings, and in time the various oak pieces will all blend together…

center panel, new chest
center panel, new chest

Otherwise, another extra-curricular woodworking that I sometimes do is spoon carving. These days, I keep a few spoons underway in a basket that I take with me when the kids & I go to the playground. It has taken a while for the moms to get used to that guy with the beard and the knives, but so far no one has called the police. I learned spoon carving 15-20 years ago at Country Workshops (www.countryworkshops.org) from Drew Langsner, and Jogge & Willie Sundqvist. This batch contains a few woods; cherry, apple and some birch. The thing I like about spoon carving is that you can take it most anywhere, and do much of it in your lap. I hew the rough shape at the shop, then do the knife work in bits & pieces as time allows.

a few spoons
a few spoons
My interest in spoons got re-kindled by the work of Robin & Nicola Wood http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/spoon-carving.htm and their posts (and others) on the forum at the bodgers’ site http://www.bodgers.org.uk/bb/phpBB2/
Country Workshops’ forum also has a lot of information about woodenware, it has been a staple there since Drew & Louise started the school in 1978…
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6 thoughts on “carved panel

  1. Peter, do you sand your spoons? They look great!. I’m planning to take a few blanks with me on our camping trip this summer. It will keep me busy so I won’t be asked to cook. haha

  2. ” The muntins are made from quartersawn white oak, the rails are riven white oak and the panel riven red oak. I am planning on painting the carvings, and in time the various oak pieces will all blend together…

    Even though the rails & mutins are white oak, the rails appear lighter in color, at least in pic. Let me ask a stupid question, if one “fumed” the oak, would it blend all the oak into a uniform brownish color one sees on arts & crafts type furniture?

    Fabulous carving on new chest.

  3. Kari

    yes, some of those spoons are sanded; although this “batch” spans 16 years. Nowadays I don’t bother with sandpaper.

    Joe: Thanks for the link to Drew’s article. I did see that, but now so can others, if inclined.

    James: the color difference is because it’s two different white oak logs, and one’s sawn & one’s split. Yes, fuming them would blend these differences a bit, but I bet it would still be visible. Over time, they will all catch up to the same place, I’d wager.

  4. Peter, oh yeah, over time the tanin will turn all the oak into a rich brown color, i was just wondering if fuming would do that instantly.

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