To reach me, try the following:

Email me

US mail at the following address:

Peter Follansbee

3 Landing Rd.

Kingston, MA 02364

781-585-5295

26 Responses to “contact”

  1. Dave Says:

    Hi there Peter,

    I just wanted to comment on your blog and how much I have enjoyed reading it.

    I had a question about a small hatchet that I saw you use on Roy Underhill’s show. I did a search to try to find it on your blog but did not find a name of it. I did however find this picture of it on your blog:

    http://pfollansbee.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/birch-w-bark-trimmed.jpg?w=510&h=375

    I am looking for a hatchet to do just what you did on Roy’s show, rough out spoon blanks. I have several hatchets that I have been using, including a carpenters axe, but none of them seem to cut that great. Mostly they glance off unless you hold them at a really steep angle. I also have a small tomahawk that I have had for several decades that I put flat bevels on and it works well but is a little on the light side.

    Is that main factor that makes a small hatchet work well is the flat ground bevel? This is what I am thinking since the hawk that I put a flat grind on works so well.

    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated as well as info on the hatchet that I linked to.

    Thanks,
    Dave

    http://traditionalskills.wordpress.com

    1. pfollansbee Says:

      Dave
      the hatchet you saw was made by a Swedish blacksmith over 20 years ago. I got it from Drew Langsner’s Country Workshops – a great resource for spoon carving. I don’t think Drew sells the same hatchet these days; but he has hatchets for spoon work. http://www.countryworkshops.org Drew can help you with the specific tool for that work…
      Peter

      1. Dave Says:

        Cool. It looks like a nice pattern. Thanks for the info.

        Dave.

  2. Bob the Bodger Says:

    You need a Gransfor Axe…. Swedish made. Avaiable via Moonraker Supplies, Wiltshire, UK or Green Tool Store UK. Bodger

    1. Dave Says:

      Yep I have looked at those. At $180 they are a little out of my price range at the moment. Would you guys recommend a single bevel or double like the one you have Peter?

      Thanks
      Dave

  3. adrie Faasse Says:

    Hey Peter,

    You are really very good in making joined stools.
    I bought a chest dated 1726 a tridarn orginial from north west wales
    17e century gateleg and a joined stool.
    I like to send you a phot of the joined stool for an example for you,
    but i am very anxious from which period this joined stool is.
    I live in holland,

    Greetings,

    Adrie

  4. mike chou Says:

    hello Peter, this is Mike, I wrote you some emails about pay you some money and use one of your photo on our art design? ie: like the “detail of underside cuts” one, thanks. hope to hear from you soon, thanks. this is mike :)

  5. Dave Says:

    Hey Peter. Could I ask you one more question about hatchets? I have it narrow down to a Mueller Carpenters Hatchet which I think will be good for spoons, bowls and general roughing out work. It has a double bevel which I think would be better than the single bevel hewing styles like the Swedish Carving Axe.

    The question I had was what weight should I look at getting? I have only found the 2.25lb version which seems a little on the heavy side, however it looks like I could special order just about any weight. I was thinking somewhere in the 1.5 to 2 lb range. That are your thoughts? I am going to order one after I get your advice and then I will stop bugging you about it. :-)

    Thanks again for the help.
    Dave

  6. Thomas Latane Says:

    Peter,
    Thanks for the mention on your site. We have had two contacts already. Lovely children wielding the cleaver and mallet. Hope they remain interested.
    I like the photos of old work mistakes (as well as your inspirational work). The dove tail hinge shows something I didn’t know . It was obviously tapered in the center before wrapping and welding, as the rough edges do not line up as they would if thicker metal were wrapped, welded and then spread away from the hinge barel
    I like the looks of your hewing hatchet. I recently made one for the Science Museum of Minnesota based on the sketch in Moxon’s book. Haven’t finished the one I started for myself.
    If you would ever consider leading a panel carving workshop in WI or MN let me know.
    Is your book, “How to Make a Joint Stool from a Tree” the project you and John started years ago?

  7. likes old wood Says:

    Saw you making spoons on the Wheelwright Shop – makes me want to try to make something from wood.

    I noticed on your site you enjoy birding. Here are three birder webcams run by the Cornell Ornithological Lab you might enjoy:

    http://www.allaboutbirds.org/page.aspx?pid=2422&ac=ac

    https://secure3.birds.cornell.edu/page.aspx?pid=2433

    http://www.livestream.com/cornellherons2

    Two are for the Great Blue Heron in Ithaca, one is for a red tail Hawk nest with three newly hatched eyyases.

  8. Mark Oppe Says:

    Peter,

    I’m an 11th generation descendant of Thomas Dennis. My grandmother will be visiting Massachussetts later this month and is wondering about the possibility of seeing some of his work. Is there any on public display in or near the Boston area that you are aware of?

  9. Kurt Sprague Says:

    Hey Peter… From time to time at this point in my life I reflect on the past. I often wondered what became of the print department at the Coop, of you, your fellow framers and the great staff upstairs. Mrs. Henning was quite the lady and business woman! I worked for her as a stock boy more or less I kept the upstairs selling floor well stocked with prints and also did the Saturday street sales. Julia Childs walked through one Saturday with her husband. I do remember you and recognized you in your picture… you still look quite the same!

  10. Mike Smith ( spoonmaker ) Says:

    Peter….. Saw you on Roy Underhill on carving spoons andyou were using a hookknife just was wondering is it your design or who you got it from.Also i first ran into you at John Alexanders you and drew pop in 1996 when i was down there making a chair at that time you were into old dove tail drawer joints.

    Mike Smith

  11. Bob Says:

    Youmight get a kick out of this Dutch joint stool/table

    http://www.vanaalstantiek.nl/index.php?showimg=319&artID=66

  12. Danny G Says:

    Hi Peter
    I saw you on The Woodwright, and I heard you make a comment about how the “20th century ruined a lot of things”. I believe it was when Roy was concerned about a flat on one of your turnings, and I remember thinking, what an excellent point. Before the machine age, hand work had no standard really, except other hand work. Now that we have arrived in the world of perfection via machines, our work is held up to the same level of high standards easily obtained by automation. So, I guess some tools marks here or there, should be thought of as a mark of true hand work.

  13. Ralph Says:

    Peter, I enjoy your blog and your work. Do you know if you can use rose of sharon wood to carve spoons or have you had any experience with it? I have a huge tree in my yard and carved my first spoon with it. I wanted to know if i could use the spoon – i didn’t know if there were health concerns.

    Also, I’m looking for a good carving knife. any suggestions?

    I live in the Plymouth area and didn’t know if you ever held a spoon carving class or know of anyone who does?

    Thanks for your time and Happy Holidays.


  14. Peter
    I would like to purchase your Jul#11 spoon.
    My computer is not set up to just email and your email does not ship up to copy and paste.
    Please reply with how I go about purchasing.
    Laurence

  15. Randall K Says:

    Really enjoy your website and your work!

  16. Bob Jones Says:

    Peter,
    Can I request that you make a DVD or write a book on turning with a pole lathe? I’ve looking all over for materials and I’m not finding much in the way of instruction. There are lots of plans for lathes, and lots of suggestions of tools to buy, but not much help on using one. I’m digging now, so any ideas for information sources would be great. Nice lathe, by the way. Is it based on the Roubo version?

  17. Fred Says:

    Peter,
    Need your help please. I saw on your website in november 2012 that you used some special punches…oh sorry…I’m french (hope it’s gonna help :o))) and it’s hard to find these punches in my country. Can you help? One last thing : french, yes, but Ilive in Réunion Island, that makes a big difference :o)))!! Thanks for your help.
    Fred…

    1. Fred Says:

      November 2010!!! Sorry!

  18. James Stenhouse - Stenhouse Custom Says:

    Was watching you on the Woodwright’s shop making the Wainscot chest. I kept focusing on the grooves in the stiles and the fact that they reversed direction. I would never flip my board, end for end, to cut the next groove. That doesn’t make any sense to me. So I guess my question is does that reversal indicate two journeymen working across from each other, which would tend to simplify and speed up the process? I make my groove then push the board across the bench to my fellow employee so he can make his.

    1. James Stenhouse - Stenhouse Custom Says:

      I just answered my own question. Flipping the board, end for end means I don’t have to reset my fence. Still getting used to working with my Hand tools and the issues therein.

  19. Dan Says:

    I think you are amazing. Thank You for your incredible kindness and sharing. You have inspired me. I am building a viking village soon, and your work will grace my longhouse….God Bless you mate!

  20. Pat Cullinan, Jr. Says:

    Dear Peter,

    The photo of the owlet resting its head touched me and lifted me. You have a good heart.

    For thou lovest all things that are, and hatest none of the things which thou hast made. Wisdom 11:25.

    Men and beasts thou wilt preserve, O Lord. For with thee is the fountain of life. Ps 35:7b, 10a.

    Kindest regards,

    Pat Cullinan, Jr.
    NY
    5/15/14

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