I have been unpacking from my trip to the Colonial Williamsburg Antiques Forum, which has then led into cleaning my shop. Thus not much photography lately. So I thought I’d dig out some pictures of period furniture. today I’d like to start with a cupboard from the Lake District.  The cupboard, dated 1691 and initialed E E H, is something of a wreck; having been incorrectly restored who-knows-when. So I will focus on the carvings and the door framing.  Pitsawn oak throughout.

 This is the central panel between the two doors in the upper section of the cupboard. Note the holes in the right-hand side of this view, presumably nail holes for fixing the panel to the bench for carving. Also the layout lines scribed with an awl are still visible on parts of the carving.

carved panel, 1691

carved panel, 1691

carving detail w layout

carving detail w layout

door framing

door framing

I didn’t shoot very much of this cupboard, but in this detail of one of the upper doors, you can see the framing arrangement. The stile with the (replaced) door knob runs the full height of the door, and is mortised to receive the horizontal rails. The hinge stile is shorter, and is tenoned into the horizontal rails…this requires some extra planning while laying out the stock and the joinery. The door swings on wooden hinges. Holes are bored into the top & bottom edge of the door frame, and pins are inserted that run into matching holes bored into the rails  above & blelow the door. If this stile ran the full height of the door, these pins would be driven into holes bored in end grain. I have seen many doors done that way, but sometimes you see them this way too.
E E H 1691

E E H 1691

Most of what I know about this group of furniture comes from Victor Chinnery’s Oak Furniture: the British Tradition (Antique Collector’s Club, 1979) – see  Chinnery’s discussion for his figures 4:169-4:183. Also, there was not too long ago an article on a related chest in the journal put out by the Regional Furniture Society. The citation is Michael Bucknole, “A Lakeland Chest Dated 1683″ in Regional Furniture (vol 18 ,2004) pp. 68-77.  To learn more about the Society, and to join, see their website  http://www.regionalfurnituresociety.com/  – the journal is excellent, the newsletters always make me wish I was over in England. They have great trips, tours and workshops. A very enthusiastic group…
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